Abstract submissions

Submitted abstracts are unedited and unscheduled. If any information in an abstract you submitted is in error, or if you cannot view your abstract, contact the Program Secretary. Contact information can be located here

3 submitted abstracts


Submitted Date and Time: 2016-08-25 15:26:03

Title: Predation shapes morphology of spring Gambusia in Northeastern Mexico

Authors:
Moody, Eric 1
Lozano-Vilano, Maria de Lourdes 2

Affiliations:
1. Arizona State University
2. UANL

Abstract:
Perennial limnocrene springs represent unique environments in arid landscapes due to their more lentic nature, environmental stability, and often, a lack of piscivorous fish. In the Chihuahuan desert, numerous limnocrenes have been colonized by fishes such as Gambusia. Over time, these populations diverged genetically and phenotypically from riverine ancestors, but it is not clear what drives this phenotypic divergence. We investigated this question in the Gambusia panuco species group, which includes the primarily riverine G. panuco, the spring endemics G. alvarezi and G. hurtadoi, and a fourth species, G. marshi, found in a variety of habitats with and without predators. We employed a geometric morphometric analysis to examine how body shape of both male and female fish differs among species, habitats, and predation regimes. We found that riverine and spring species diverged morphologically, with G. marshi exhibiting a variable, intermediate body shape. Within G. marshi, morphological variation was explained by piscivore presence in both sexes but by habitat type only in males, suggesting that predators exert a stronger selective force on Gambusia morphology among both sexes but that males also respond to differences in the physical environment. Further supporting this notion, fish from sites with piscivores present had larger caudal relative peduncle areas. These results are of particular importance because many desert spring fishes are threatened by declining groundwater levels and introduced species, both of which could alter the morphology of these fish if they persist under altered environmental conditions.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Hubbs

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-08-19 18:12:05

Title: Celebrating and conserving the diversity of desert fishes

Authors:
Hoagstrom, Chris 1
Houston, Derek 2
Mercado-Silva, Norman 3

Affiliations:
1. Department of Zoology, Weber State University
2. Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University
3. Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Conservación, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos

Abstract:
The desert environment is a hotbed of endemism in fishes. Ongoing research continues to discover and describe more and more endemic diversity. Based on an up-to-date literature review, there are over 300 putative endemic taxa (species, subspecies, and distinct evolutionary lineages) occurring throughout arid/semiarid North America. These endemics are distributed among 28 separate geographical areas, each of which has a history of isolation from other areas due to limited aquatic connectivity that restricts inter-area dispersal. Overall, there is very little faunal overlap between opposing subgroups of 13 “northern” and 15 “southern” areas of endemism. This is evidence that each subgroup constitutes a distinct desert region for fish endemism, with greater levels of aquatic connectivity among areas within regions than between them. However, nested within this subdivision, all areas of endemism have unique assemblages of endemics. In addition, estimated times of origin for endemic taxa are broad and range from the Middle Miocene to the Quaternary. Thus, endemic biodiversity has arisen largely independently throughout these desert areas and has built up over millions of years. That is, each area of endemism has been a generator of endemic taxa and, thereafter has served as a “living museum” or “natural repository” for ancient taxa that have accumulated over time. Hence, to preserve the sum of desert-fish biodiversity, conservation efforts will be needed in all areas of endemism. Further, conservation actions must prioritize protection of the natural habitats and ecological processes that have produced and maintained each unique taxon.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-08-15 15:28:53

Title:

Authors:
Kesner, Brian 1

Affiliations:
1. Marsh and Associates, LLC

Abstract:
Enter abstract text (English);

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type:
Session:
Student Award:

Comments:




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