Abstract submissions

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8 submitted abstracts


Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-23 12:11:14

Title: Comparison of Larvae and Early Juveniles of Hybognathus Species (Cyprinidae) in Colorado and New Mexico

Authors:
Snyder, Darrel E. 1
Brandenburg, W. Howard 2
Sherrod, John P. 2
Bjork, C. Lynn 1
Charles, Jennifer A. 1
Seal, Sean C. 1
Platania, Steven P. 2
Bestgen, Kevin, R. 1

Affiliations:
1. Colorado State University, Larval Fish Laboratory
2. American Southwest Ichthyological Researchers, Albuquerque

Abstract:
Hybognathus are small-bodied minnows with a small, slightly subterminal, crescent-shaped mouth, long coiled gut, dark peritoneum, typically 8 dorsal- and 8 anal-fin rays, dorsal fin origin before the pelvic fins, and about 35-40 lateral-line scales. Three of seven recognized species species are found in Colorado (CO) or New Mexico (NM). Rio Grande silvery minnow H. amarus (RGSM) is a federal and NM endangered species that was endemic to the Rio Grande and Pecos River basins, but is now restricted to the middle Rio Grande, NM. Plains minnow H. placitus (PM) is native to Great Plains drainages, including eastern CO, where it is state endangered, and NM, where, as a non-native species, it has displaced RGSM in the Pecos River. Brassy minnow H. hankinsoni (BM) is a more northern, very wide-spread species native to, and state threatened in, eastern-most CO; however, non-native populations have become established in limited reaches of the Colorado River in western CO (and Utah). RGSM and PM broadcast eggs in open, flowing water that quickly swell to large size, become semi-buoyant, and drift downstream, whereas BM broadcasts smaller, demersal, adhesive eggs in relatively still, vegetated shallows. Based mostly on reared series, larval development of the three species is very similar with small, oblique, terminal mouths forming shortly after hatching; oval eyes in earlier larvae (slightly oval in RGSM and some PM); typically 25-27 preanal and 36-38 total myomeres; and preanal lengths averaging 69-74% of standard length (SL). PM hatch, complete yolk absorption, and tend to become mesolarvae at larger sizes than the others (typically hatch at 5-6 vs 3-4 mm SL), whereas BM usually develop gut coils and transition to later developmental intervals at slightly larger sizes (typically juveniles by 15-16 mm SL). Just-hatched RGSM and PM have unpigmented eyes and bodies, whereas BM have no or little eye pigment but notable body pigment including a distinctive, widely scattered pattern of melanophores over the dorsum of head, eyes, and body—perhaps unique among North American cyprinids. Also unlike the others, later BM larvae develop a midventral line of melanophores from heart to vent and oblique branchial-preopercular lines under the head, and later juveniles develop stronger body pigmentation and a more complete lateral band. The mouths of juvenile RGSM and PM become more horizontal, ending near bottom-of-eye level, but in BM remain more oblique, ending at mid-eye level. Later juveniles of PM have longer snouts and smaller eyes than RGSM.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-23 11:13:23

Title: Spatio-temporal variation in parasite communities maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex class II in the endangered Rio Grande Silvery Minnow

Authors:
Osborne, Megan 1
Pilger, Tyler 1
Lusk, Joel 2
Turner, Thomas 1

Affiliations:
1. University of New Mexico
2. US Fish and Wildlife Service

Abstract:
We combined genetic (MHC Class II and microsatellites), parasitological and ecological data to explore the relationship between these factors in the remnant wild Rio Grande silvery minnow population, an endangered species found in the southwestern United States. Fish were infected with multiple parasites on the gills and there was spatio-temporal variation in parasite communities and patterns of infection. Despite its highly endangered status and chronically low genetic effective size, Rio Grande silvery minnow had high allelic diversity at MHC Class II with more alleles recognised at the presumptive DAB1 locus compared to DAB3 locus. We identified significant associations between specific parasites and MHC alleles against a backdrop of generalist parasite prevalence. We also found that individuals with higher individual heterozygosity (at neutral loci) and higher amino acid divergence between MHC alleles had lower parasite abundance and diversity (as measured by an index of parasitization). Taken together, these results suggest a role for fluctuating selection imposed by spatio-temporal variation in pathogen communities and divergent allele advantage, in maintenance of high MHC polymorphism. Understanding the complex interaction of habitat, pathogens and immunity in protected species will require integrated genetic and field studies to ensure that sufficient diversity is maintained to respond to novel pathogens, and changing host-pathogen interactions.


Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-22 21:35:53

Title: ASSESSING PASSAGE SUCCESS OF WARNER SUCKERS AT A NEWLY CONSTRUCTED, SUCKER-FRIENDLY FISHWAY IN SOUTHEASTERN OREGON

Authors:
Scheerer, Paul 1
Brandt, Troy 2

Affiliations:
1. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
2. River Design Group

Abstract:
The Warner sucker (Catostomus warnerensis) is endemic to the Warner Valley, an endorheic subbasin of the Great Basin in southeastern Oregon and northwestern Nevada. This species was historically abundant and its historical range includes three permanent lakes, several ephemeral lakes, and three major tributary drainages. Warner sucker abundance and distribution has declined over the past century and it was federally listed as threatened in 1985, due to habitat fragmentation and threats posed by the proliferation of piscivorous non-native game fishes. Recent recovery actions have focused on improving/providing passage at aging irrigation diversion dams that are common on tributaries in the drainage. In 2015-2016, we assessed passage success and hydraulics at a newly constructed sucker-friendly fishway at the Dyke Diversion on Twentymile Creek. The new fishway is 57 ft long with ten pools/cells, has 0.5 ft weir drops for redband trout passage, 1 ft square orifices for Warner sucker passage, and a simulated streambed floor (cobble). It was designed for a passage window of April-July, maximum orifice velocity of 4 ft/s, range of flows between 35-148 cfs, minimum pool depth of 4 ft, and a slope <4%. We PIT tagged adult suckers and monitored passage in 2015 and 2016 using fixed PIT-tag arrays located at the upper and lower fishway orifices, at the tail of the pool located downstream of the fishway, and at the riffle located upstream of the pool impounded by the irrigation diversion dam. Additionally, we measured hydraulic conditions in the fishway at various stream discharges. We documented sucker passage success in both years and developed recommendations to improve upon the initial design.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-22 21:34:21

Title: Oregon / Northern California Area Report, November 2016

Authors:
Scheerer, Paul 1
Leal, Jimmy 2
Brandt, Troy 3
Smith, Terry 4
Markle, Doug 5
Divine, Paul 6
Banks, David 1
Reid, Stewart 7

Affiliations:
1. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
2. Bureau of Land Management
3. River Design Group
4. US Forest Service
5. Oregon State University
6. California Department of Fish and Wildlife
7. Western Fishes

Abstract:
The northwestern extreme of the desert region includes several endorheic drainage subbasins in Oregon, northeastern California, and northwestern Nevada (Fort Rock, Chewaucan, Goose, Warner, Catlow, Alvord, Malheur Lakes, Coyote Lakes, and Quinn). This region supports remnant fish faunas that once inhabited extensive pluvial Pleistocene lakes.
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW): 1) estimated Warner sucker, Catostomus warnerensis, abundance in the Twentymile Creek subbasin (Warner basin) and monitored movement of PIT tagged suckers to assess passage at a newly constructed, sucker-friendly fish ladder, 2) obtained a population estimate and evaluated habitat conditions for Foskett speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus ssp., in Foskett and Dace Springs (in cooperation with BLM), 3) obtained a population estimate and evaluated habitat conditions for Borax Lake chub, Gila boraxobius, at Borax Lake in the Alvord basin, 4) assessed fish assemblage structure (native and nonnative) in the Owyhee basin, 5) provided information for a range-wide redband trout conservation in the Upper Snake River basin, and 6) participated in a Lahontan cutthroat working group meeting in Reno, NV.
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), with help from ODFW, continued ongoing habitat restoration (manual) at Foskett Spring for Foskett speckled dace, including the thinning of aquatic vegetation from pools dug in 2013 and 2014 in the tule and cattail marshes. Permits are secured to conduct mechanical restoration next winter. BLM also secured additional funds ($215K) for the next phase of the Honey Creek passage and screening project to benefit Warner suckers and redband trout (6 unscreened and unladdered diversions remain to be completed).

Doug Markle, retired Oregon State University professor, completed “A Guide to Freshwater Fishes of Oregon”, which includes detailed information on the taxonomy and distribution of Oregon’s desert fishes.

The US Forest Service (USFS), with collaboration from USFWS and ODFW conducted population index surveys for Modoc suckers in Thomas Creek. Counts were down ~50% from 2015 counts, likely due to drought (low stream flows) in 2015, but within the range of variability observed over the past decade.

The River Design Group, in collaboration with the Lake County Watershed Council, US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), BLM, USFS, and Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB): 1) conducted surveys and provided fish passage conceptual plans and prioritization to benefit redband trout in the Deep Creek subbasin of the Warner Basin, 2) completed surveys and provided design plans for channel realignment to address an eroding terrace and road ditch discharge in the Thomas Creek Basin to benefit Goose Lake redband trout, Modoc suckers, Pit-Klamath lamprey, and speckled dace (construction planned for Fall 2016), 3) conducted hydrologic/hydraulic analyses and fish passage alternatives associated with irrigation diversions in the Warner basin to benefit Warner sucker and redband trout, 4) conducted reconnaissance plan to prioritize fish passage barriers and habitat restoration in the Goose Lake basin, and 5) conducted fish passage and habitat restoration projects in the Chewaucan basin to benefit redband trout.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFS) conducted drought monitoring on three streams in the Goose Lake basin (Lassen, Cold, and Willow Creeks) that provide habitat for Goose Lake redband trout, Goose Lake sucker, Goose Lake lamprey, and Pit sculpin) and six tributaries that provide habitat for Modoc sucker (Turner, Washington, Coffee Mill, Hulbert, Dutch Flat, and Johnson Creeks). Preliminary results indicated high stream temperatures and reduced flows affected both quantity and quality of available fish habitat due to extreme drought conditions, although conditions have improved since 2015. CDFW also received a grant to conduct genetic analysis of Eagle Lake Rainbow trout (samples will be collected in 2017 and 2018) to evaluate genetic diversity and inbreeding related to the effects of artificial propagation of this native strain.

Stewart Reid, Western Fishes, 1) monitored Modoc sucker populations in Northern California including suppression of green sunfish in Turner Creek, 2) worked with Pit River Tribes to assess current and historical fish distribution in NF Pit River including a Tribal Ecological Knowledge component (questionnaires and interviews) and an historical/ethnographic component and outreach component to inform community of traditional food fishes.


Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Area
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-22 17:47:11

Title: A pup’s life: Pupfish growth, reproduction, and movement in a hypervariable environment

Authors:
Jones, Alexander C. 1
Hunt, Joseph R. 1
Pansin, Chalisa 1
Aleksic, Maja 1
Chamnong, Olivia 1
Dalpatadu, Shalini R. 1
Hillyard, Stanley 1
van Breukelen, Frank 1

Affiliations:
1. University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Abstract:
Salt Creek, located in Death Valley National Park, is among the most extreme environments fish are known to inhabit. Depending on spatial location and season, temperatures in Salt Creek range from 0 °C to over 40 °C. Thus many have assumed that Salt Creek Pupfish are well adapted to temperatures as high as 40 °C based mainly on anectdotal observations. However, it is not known whether the pupfish observed in the areas of the creek that reach such temperatures survive. We conducted a mark-recapture study to determine whether fish that are marked in the warmer, ephemeral habitats at Salt Creek move to permanent, cooler habitats as the creek dries. The number of fish recaptured from the ephemeral portions of the creek decreased markedly as the summer progressed. However, fish in the ephemeral portions of the creek grew faster and benefitted from an earlier breeding season. These data indicate that there are both costs and benefits for fish which colonize ephemeral habitats at Salt Creek.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Hubbs

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-22 16:49:22

Title: Native Fish Conservation Areas in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas

Authors:
Garrett, Gary P. 1
Birdsong, Timothy 2
Labay, Ben 3
Bean, Megan 2

Affiliations:
1. University of Texas, Department of Integrative Biology
2. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
3. Siglo Group

Abstract:
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, in partnership with University of Texas Fishes of Texas Project and Siglo Group, has developed a statewide network of focal watersheds that represents a set of native fish “strongholds”. In the Chihuahuan Desert region of Texas six Native Fish Conservation Areas in the Rio Grande, Pecos and Devils rivers were delineated and 39 focal fish species were identified as priorities for conservation. This was accomplished using a spatial prioritization analysis that identifies focal areas for conservation based on species distribution models for priority fish taxa. An Advisory Council of experts in the region has also been developed and they will be tasked with identifying priority conservation, restoration, monitoring and research actions for preservation of native fishes, their habitats and other aquatic resources in these watersheds. In addition, this collaboration will help to catalyze cooperation, collaboration and leveraging of technical and financial resources among local, state and federal natural resource management agencies, universities, NGOs and other local partners that contribute to conservation in the Chihuahuan NFCAs.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-22 16:37:54

Title: Celebrating and conserving the diversity of desert fishes

Authors:
Hoagstrom, Chris 1
Houston, Derek 2
Mercado-Silva, Norman 3

Affiliations:
1. Department of Zoology, Weber State University
2. Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Iowa State University
3. Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Conservación, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos

Abstract:
The desert environment is a hotbed of endemism in fishes. Ongoing research continues to discover and describe more and more endemic diversity. Based on an up-to-date literature review, there are over 300 putative endemic taxa (species, subspecies, and distinct evolutionary lineages) occurring throughout arid/semiarid North America. These endemics are distributed among 28 separate geographical areas, each of which has a history of isolation from other areas due to limited aquatic connectivity that restricts inter-area dispersal. Overall, there is very little faunal overlap between opposing subgroups of 13 “northern” and 15 “southern” areas of endemism. This is evidence that each subgroup constitutes a distinct desert region for fish endemism, with greater levels of aquatic connectivity among areas within regions than between them. However, nested within this subdivision, all areas of endemism have unique assemblages of endemics. In addition, estimated times of origin for endemic taxa are broad and range from the Middle Miocene to the Quaternary. Thus, endemic biodiversity has arisen largely independently throughout these desert areas and has built up over millions of years. That is, each area of endemism has been a generator of endemic taxa and, thereafter has served as a “living museum” or “natural repository” for ancient taxa that have accumulated over time. Hence, to preserve the sum of desert-fish biodiversity, conservation efforts will be needed in all areas of endemism. Further, conservation actions must prioritize protection of the natural habitats and ecological processes that have produced and maintained each unique taxon.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2016-09-22 14:41:42

Title: Guide to Cyprinid Fish Larvae and Early Juveniles of the Upper Colorado River Basin with Computer Interactive Key

Authors:
Snyder, Darrel E. 1
Seal, Sean C. 1
Charles, Jennifer A. 1
Bjork, C. Lynn 1

Affiliations:
1. Colorado State University, Larval Fish Laboratory

Abstract:
Use of collections of fish larvae and young-of-the-year juveniles to help document fish spawning sites and seasons or assess larval production, transport, distribution, nursery habitat, survival, and other aspects of early life history, requires diagnostic criteria to accurately distinguish target species from similar appearing taxa in the waters sampled. To facilitate identification of the larvae and early juveniles of fifteen carps and minnows (most of the Cyprinidae) in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), including the five native species (three endangered), developmental series of reared and collected specimens were studied for differences in size relative to developmental state, morphology, meristics, and pigmentation. The results, including detailed descriptive species accounts, comparative summary tables, and instructions for downloading and using the associated computer-interactive key, were documented as a manuscript in a final report to the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program and published as Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW, formerly CDOW) Technical Publication 47 (Snyder et al. 2016). Electronic (PDF) copies of the guide are available on the CPW and Larval Fish Laboratory (LFL) websites, the latter at http://warnercnr.colostate.edu/lfl-downloadable-keys-guides-and-bibliography; printed copies are available upon request to CPW. The associated key (as well as a family-level computer-interactive key) is available at the same LFL website and on a compact disk accompanying printed versions of the publication. This guide complements a previously published guide to the larvae and early juveniles of UCRB catostomids (Snyder and Muth 2004, CDOW Technical Publication 42). Together, these guides complete a long series of descriptive investigations begun over 35 years ago with publication of Contributions to a Guide to the Cypriniform Fish Larvae of the Upper Colorado River System in Colorado (Snyder 1981, Bureau of Land Management Biological Sciences Series No. 3, Denver).

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




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