Abstract submissions

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 14:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-10-14 11:00:29

Title: Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility

Authors:
Weissenfluh, Darrick 1
Feuerbacher, Olin 1
Simons, Lee 1
Chaudoin, Ambre 2
Barlics II, Robert 2
Linares-Casenave, Javier 1

Affiliations:
1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
2. The Great Basin Institute, Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility

Abstract:
In 2014, work at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility (AMFCF) has focused on establishing a captive population of the endangered Devils Hole pupfish, Cyprinodon diabolis; strengthening partnerships; and operating, maintaining, and troubleshooting systems associated with maintaining environmental conditions in the 100,000 gallon refuge tank (RT). Devils Hole pupfish (DHP) eggs as well as Devils Hole (DH) invertebrates were recovered from Devils Hole (DH) and brought to the AMFCF from November 2013 to January 2014. A total of 39 viable DHP eggs were recovered, 33 (85%) survived to hatching, and 29 (74%) reached sexual maturity. Mature fish were introduced into the RT in June 2014. Prior to fish introductions, the RT was repeatedly inoculated with invertebrates recovered from DH (2nd and 3rd generation). Plans are being implemented to monitor multiple environmental and ecological parameters in the RT, as well as adult and early life history stages of DHP. All of the original 29 adult pupfish remain alive as of September 2014, and several larval fish in the range of 4 to12 mm length have been observed. Water quality in the RT deep pool is nearly constant at 30 ⁰C, 50-75% dissolved oxygen saturation, and 7.5 pH. Water quality over the RT’s shallow shelf varies daily and seasonally depending on direct sunlight, which is regulated to mimic DH conditions. Water depth over the RT’s shallow shelf is set to mimic historical water levels at DH. Research using environmental-DNA is underway to monitor successional changes in the RT and to compare to conditions at DH and other springs in the Amargosa Valley. Biologists with the Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), National Park Service, and Nevada Department of Wildlife are working with academics in the US and Mexico to further DHP conservation. Scientists at the USFWS Abernathy Fish Technology Center, UC Berkeley, and UC Davis are using next generation sequence technology to develop a genotyping tool to monitor and manage DHP populations. Efforts to establish and maintain a second captive DHP population in aquaria will continue in collaboration with government and university scientists in Mexico and the USA.

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 14:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-10-14 09:09:31

Title: Successful management of Stewart Lake wetland as a nursery for endangered razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, on the middle Green River, Utah

Authors:
Schelly, Robert 1
Breen, Matt 1
Wilson, Krissy 1

Affiliations:
1. Utah Div. Wildlife Resources

Abstract:
In the Colorado River Basin, endangered razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, have been impacted by impoundment-related habitat loss and the introduction of nonnative species. For decades, survival of wild-spawned razorback suckers to juvenile stages has been negligible, and populations have been maintained by stocking of hatchery-raised fish. Here we report on successful efforts to manage Stewart Lake, a gated wetland on the middle Green River near Jensen, Utah, as a nursery for wild-spawned razorback sucker, using a trap and weir system to exclude adult nonnative fishes during filling. In a cooperative multi-year effort by Federal and State agencies called the Larval Trigger Study Plan, light trapping is being used to detect the presence of larval razorback suckers in the river, triggering increased releases from Flaming Gorge Reservoir so as to realize peak flows during larval drift. In early June, 2014, Stewart Lake was filled during this high water period to maximize entrainment of razorback sucker larvae. The growth and distribution of razorback suckers in the wetland was monitored throughout the summer, with the gate opened for drawdown in early September. Using a trap to sample fish exiting the wetland into the river, hundreds of juvenile razorback suckers, up to 168 mm in total length, were observed. The management of Stewart Lake thus creates suitable nursery conditions for the successful recruitment of razorback suckers, which will be critical to the recovery of this species.

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 14:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-10-07 11:55:56

Title: Conserving a fish that is not there: Pacific Lamprey in southern California

Authors:
Reid, Stewart B. 1
Goodman, Damon H. 2

Affiliations:
1. Western Fishes
2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Abstract:
The distribution of Pacific Lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus, once extended into northern Baja California, but has contracted northward in recent years. The southernmost population is currently found in Big Sur. Nevertheless, recovery of the species involves promoting its conservation in historical drainages where it no longer exists, so that if/when Pacific Lamprey return they will find hospitable conditions. Ongoing conservation programs include outreach to managers and community members to build awareness of the lamprey habitat and passage needs, survey and assessment of potential habitat, development of realistic monitoring plans, incorporation of lamprey needs into habitat restoration projects, modification of passage barriers and assessment of potential reintroductions. Recent work includes monitoring of the San Luis Obispo Drainage, surveying of over 50 mi of potential habitat in the Santa Clara drainage, presence/absence surveys of southern California drainages, passage projects on the San Luis Obispo and Santa Clara Rivers, and development of stakeholder participation.

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 11:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-10-01 11:55:46

Title: Documentation of spawning by Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, Razorback Sucker in the lower Grand Canyon during 2014.

Authors:
Barkstedt, Judith M. 1
Barkalow, Adam L. 1
Platania, Steven 1
Kegerries, Ron B. 2
Albrecht, Brandon A. 2
Healy, Brian D. 3
Stolberg, James R. 4
McKinstry, Mark C. 5

Affiliations:
1. ASIR and MSB
2. Bio-West
3. Grand Canyon National Park
4. USBR, Lower Colorado Region
5. USBR, Upper Colorado Region

Abstract:
The Grand Canyon section of the Colorado River, from Glen Canyon Dam downstream to Pearce Ferry, supports federally endangered Gila cypha, Humpback Chub and Xyrauchen texanus, Razorback Sucker. Downstream of the Grand Canyon in Lake Mead, stable reproducing Razorback Sucker populations have been documented since 1996. Recent tracking of sonic-tagged adults and captures of larval Razorback Sucker by Bio-West in the Colorado River inflow of Lake Mead suggested this species might, at least seasonally, be expanding upstream of the lake and be using the lower Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. In 2014 a study was initiated to determine the distribution of adult, juvenile, and larval Razorback Sucker in the Grand Canyon.

The 100-mile long study area for the 2014 larval fish survey in the lower Grand Canyon began near Lava Falls (RM 179.2) and extended downstream to Pearce Ferry, at the Colorado River inflow into Lake Mead (RM 280). This section of river is characterized by a narrow river corridor with limited floodplain development, gradients alternating between steep rapids and long pools and runs, and substrata ranging from silt to bedrock. A general randomized tessellation stratified (GRTS) design was used to generate fish sampling locations for this study. This technique ensures spatially balanced samples and a robust statistical design. The 40 sampling locations generated for this project were sampled monthly (n = 6) from April through September 2014. The 240 larval fish sites sampled in the lower Grand Canyon during 2014 yielded 10 species and was numerically dominated by catostomids (>80% of cumulative sample). Noteworthy was the collection of over 450 larval Razorback Sucker in the lower Grand Canyon at over 20 unique sites during April and May. Collection locations of larval Razorback Sucker ranged from RM 179.1 (upper end of the study area) downstream to RM 279.1 (our lowermost sampling site). The 2014 larval fish study documented spawning of Razorback Sucker in the Grand Canyon thereby expanding the breeding range of this endangered fish and is another positive step towards recovery for this species.


Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 11:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 22:37:11

Title: Algae as Bioindicators of Stream Function in Acid Mine Drainage Systems: Qualitative Analyses of Algal Communities in Santa Cruz Watershed

Authors:
Moore, Hannah 1
Gwinn, Jess 1
Reinthal, Peter 1
Floyd , Gray 2

Affiliations:
1. University of Arizona
2. USGS

Abstract:
Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) alters stream characteristics usually via an input of acidic and metal-laden water from abandoned mines and tailings. In the Santa Cruz watershed, many geologic workings, tailings, and mine drainages periodically discharge metal-rich, acidic water and leachates into surrounding streams. These impacted aquatic systems are characterized by increased acidity and metal levels. Algae communities can be used as bio-indicators of stream function as indicated through decreased biodiversity and primary production. Here we examined algal communities in two sites in the Patagonia Mountains: Harshaw Creek, with neutral pH and low metal content and Alum Creek, with inputs from mine tailings and adits, which has relatively low pH and elevated metals content. We qualitatively analyzed the algae community structure during pre- and post- monsoon seasons, February 2011 and July 2011, respectively. Harshaw Creek had higher algae generic richness (14 total genera present with five of those being Chrysophyta, six Chlorophyta, and three Cyanophyta/ Dinoflagellates) than Alum Gulch (seven genera present with four being in Chrysophyta and three Chlorophyta) in both seasons. Based on these preliminary findings, we investigated algae diversity of both sites in 2013 and 2014 using quantitative and qualitative techniques. We used a Sedgwick rafter slide to determine the relative abundance of the algae, as indicated by average cell counts, present at each location. Fluorometric techniques were then used to examine the amount of chlorophyll A, a key biochemical component in photosynthesis, in each stream. Comparisons were then made between 2013 and 2014. Such information is crucial to understand the impacts of abandoned mines on aquatic resources and biotic communities in the Santa Cruz drainage.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Hubbs

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 11:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 22:23:05

Title: Sex ratio variation determines the ecological impacts of mosquitofish populations

Authors:
Fryxell, David C 1
Arnett, Heather A 2
Apgar, Travis M 1
Roessler, Kyla M 1
Kinnison, Michael T 2
Palkovacs, Eric P 1

Affiliations:
1. University of California – Santa Cruz
2. University of Maine – Orono

Abstract:
The western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, is a common desert aquatic invader which has strong impacts on native communities and ecosystems. Populations of the sexually dimorphic western mosquitofish vary drastically in sex ratio across space and time. Here we tested whether the ecological impacts of G. affinis populations depend on the sex ratio using experimental pond ecosystems. Populations of twelve mature mosquitofish were introduced to thirty 1,136 liter experimental ponds in replicated sex ratio treatments of 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent male fish. Six ponds served as fishless control treatments. Community ecological and ecosystem responses were then measured weekly for a month. After two weeks a positive trend in zooplankton counts and a negative trend in pelagic chlorophyll A concentration emerged with increasing proportion of males. Interestingly, this cascading effect of sex ratio affected pond temperature and pH as well. Nonlinear patterns in some response variables at some timepoints suggest sex ratio effects are not due solely to biomass differences between the sexes. Attempts to reduce mosquitofish population size that modify sex ratio due to sex-biased capture rates are likely to modify the ecological impacts of the species.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Hubbs

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 22:02:47

Title: Lessons learned (or not): U.S. Endangered Species Act Section 7 and native fish conservation

Authors:
Duncan, Douglas K. 1

Affiliations:
1. USFWS

Abstract:
Implementation of the U.S. Endangered Species Act (Act) can be highly convoluted, bureaucratic, and times seems at cross purposes. Section 7 of the Act is the epitomy of that. There are two major sub-sections of Section 7. Section 7(a)(1) restates the purposes of the Act, which are that all federal agencies must use their authorities to recover listed species. Section 7(a)(2) requires federal agencies to &#39consult&#39 with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or the National Marine Fisheries Service (depending on the species), when an agency action may affect a listed species. An agency action could include actions on federal land, a federal permit, or federal funding. The purpose of 7(a)(2) is to insure that federal actions do not jeopardize the continued existence of a listed species, do not adversely modify or destroy designated critical habitat, and allow for the take of individuals of listed species.

The regulatory construct implementing 7(a)2) basically allows the status of a species to be negatively affected, contrary to the intent of the act. Some wags in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refer to Section 7 consultation as &#39jeopardy by a thousand paper cuts&#39. Significant &quotconservation&quot is not mandated under 7(a)(2) until a proposed project is determined to cause jeopardy or adverse modification or destruction of critical habitat. Such determinations are, thankfully, exceeding rare.

However, as discussed in Sally Stefferuds&#39 paper at the Desert Fishes Council in 2001, species conservation can be achieved in Section 7 consultation. Achieving conservation through Section 7 consultation largely depends on the conservation ethic of the consulting agency and their biologist, and the workload, dedication, and negotiation skills of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist. I will present examples of consultations that did, and did not promote recovery, and the reasons why.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 15:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 21:34:17

Title: Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program 2014 overview

Authors:
Trammell, Melissa 1
McAbee, Kevin 2
Cavalli, Pete 3

Affiliations:
1. National Park Service
2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program
3. Wyoming Game and Fish Department

Abstract:
The Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program was established in 1988 to help bring four species of endangered fish back from the brink of extinction: the Humpback Chub, Gila cypha, Bonytail, G. elegans, Colorado Pikeminnow, Ptychocheilus lucius, and Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus. The Recovery Program is a unique partnership of local, state, and federal agencies, water and power interests, and environmental groups working to recover endangered fish in the Upper Colorado River Basin while water development proceeds in accordance with federal and state laws and interstate compacts. Recovery involves restoring and managing stream flows and habitat, propagation and stocking of hatchery-raised endangered fish, nonnative fish control, research and monitoring, public outreach and program management. The goal of recovery is to achieve natural, self-sustaining populations of the endangered fish so they no longer require protection under the federal Endangered Species Act. Individual research and monitoring projects within the Recovery Program have often been reported at Desert Fishes Council meetings over the last 26 years, but the full breadth of the Recovery Program may be less well known among council members. I will present an overview of the Recovery Program&#39s progress and status of the fishes, with an emphasis on nonnative fish control. The threats to recovery remain serious, but much has been accomplished. Recovery of long-lived species requires ongoing management action plus patience and cooperation from all partners.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 15:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 19:51:07

Title: Recovery of Moapa dace, Moapa coriacea, in southern Nevada

Authors:
Simons, Lee 1
Guadalupe, Kevin 2
Syzdek, David 3
LaVoie, Amy 4
Scoppettone, G. Gary 5

Affiliations:
1. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Las Vegas
2. Nevada Department of Wildlife
3. Southern Nevada Water Authority
4. Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge
5. U.S. Geological Survey

Abstract:
The Moapa dace, Moapa coriacea, has received much conservation support since it was recognized as endangered nearly 50 years ago. Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge was in 1979 the first National Wildlife Refuge established to protect a listed fish. Warm Springs Natural Area was acquired in 2007 to benefit native species and recovery of Moapa dace. These property investments and a long history of biological monitoring linked to restoration actions, ecological research, and Endangered Species Act consultations create a strong foundation for recovery. Despite a dramatic collapse in numbers from 1994 to 1997, and a smaller decline from 2007 to 2008, the Moapa dace population has increased consistently from a historic low of 459 estimated fish in 2008 to 17 year high of 2,248 estimated fish in 2014. Sustained restoration in recent years led to this population growth. Recent eradication of tilapia from the Warm Springs area sets the stage for even more dramatic recovery by Moapa dace and the Muddy River ecosystem in the near future. Recent and future recovery progress depends upon a focused, dedicated, and inclusive recovery program comprised of many partners that bring diverse perspectives and resources to the recovery planning process. These partners include federal, tribal, state, and local jurisdictions, several public utilities, The Nature Conservancy, academics at several universities, and religious and private landowners. This partnership demands effective collaboration and provides robust conservation outcomes.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 11:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 18:46:05

Title: Devils Hole pupfish, Cyprinodon diabolis: status and recent research in 2014

Authors:
Simons, Lee 1
Gaines, Bailey 2
Goldstein, Jeff 2
Wilson, Kevin 2
Wullschleger, John 3
Sjoberg, Jon 4
Senger, Brandon 4

Affiliations:
1. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Las Vegas
2. Death Valley National Park
3. Water Resources Division, National Park Service
4. Nevada Department of Wildlife

Abstract:
Managing agencies in collaboration with academic institutions continue to use both basic and applied research to manage the critically endangered Devils Hole pupfish, Cyprinodon diabolis. The National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), and the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) continue to monitor ecosystem and population dynamics of Devils Hole through a Long Term Ecosystem Monitoring Plan (LTEMP) that was initiated in August 2011. Number of observable pupfish increased 65% from fall 2013 (65 observable fish) to fall 2014 (107 observable fish). Status check dives in January (79 & 61 observable fish) and June 2014 (112 & 117 observable fish) suggest that the life history of Devils Hole pupfish may be shifting. Two applied research projects were published in 2014. The University of Nevada Reno investigated the possible effects of climate change on reproductive success on the shallow shelf of Devils Hole. Authors suggest that a reduction in reproductive success may occur due to higher daily peak water temperatures on the shallow shelf during spring. A publication from the University of California Berkeley described a Risk Assessment for removal of different life stages of Devils Hole pupfish to establish a refuge population at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility (AMFCF). The Risk Assessment projected a high risk of extinction in the near and long term for Devils Hole pupfish. At least three distinctive types of effects interact in dynamic and complicated ways to impact growth of the wild Devils Hole pupfish population.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 15:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 18:38:12

Title: A comparison of mechanical removal efforts of Green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus, from three native fish streams in Arizona

Authors:
Love-Chezem, Tiffany 1
Crowder, Clayton 1
Robinson, Anthony 1
Partridge, David 1

Affiliations:
1. Arizona Game and Fish Department

Abstract:
Presence of non-native fishes is often correlated with decline of native fishes, and investments of time and money to chemically or mechanically remove these fish can be significant. One example is the highly piscivorous Green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus, which is linked to local extirpations of native fishes. Three native fish streams in Arizona, with ongoing L. cyanellus mechanical removal projects, were compared to assess effects of removal frequency and methodology. East Ash Creek has a long-term, frequent removal effort (monthly removals since November 2013) and large population of L. cyanellus, Spring Creek has a short-term, frequent removal effort (eight removal trips since May 2014) and a small population, and Redfield Canyon has a long-term, infrequent removal effort (two to three times a year since 2007) and an intermediate population. The most effective method at East Ash Creek was backpack electrofishing, trapping was more effective in Spring Creek, and Redfield Canyon showed similar result for trapping and backpack electrofishing. East Ash Creek is the only system exhibiting a decline in catch per unit effort (CPUE) over time, with no L. cyanellus captured in August 2014. The differential success of the methods is likely due to the size of the populations and habitat differences; with trapping more effective on smaller populations and in larger more complex habitat. The seemingly stable CPUE in Redfield Canyon and Spring Creek is likely due lower removal effort and connectivity with source populations. Overall this comparison has provided insights in controlling and eliminating L. cyanellus.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 18:33:11

Title: Nevada Area Report

Authors:
Miskow, Eric 1
Simons, Lee 2
Guadalupe, Kevin 3
Harter, James 2
Petersen, Jeff 3
Gilmore, Todd 2
Martin, Andrew 4

Affiliations:
1. Nevada Natural Heritage Program
2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
3. Nevada Department of Wildlife
4. University of Colorado

Abstract:
Nevada waters contain 16, endangered and 6 threatened species of fishes as well as numerous undescribed At-risk fish taxa. A summary, overview and status of Nevada’s desert fishes, current research and management projects in the state will be addressed. Information on selected areas includes:
Restoration efforts at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge continue on several systems including crayfish eradication at South Scruggs which began in 2012, with restoration efforts to begin in October of 2014. Restoration at Longstreet/Rodgers system has been completed and the Five Springs area has planned channel restoration where the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish, Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes inhabit. Additionally, recent genetic work by Andy Martin (U. of Colorado) has determined the first whole genome sequence of a pupfish, C. nevadensis this should facilitate a host of studies focused on various questions. In the White River region of eastern Nevada, restoration and habitat efforts for the Endangered Pahranagat roundtail chub, Gila robusta jordani at both the refugia population and the wild population continue. Much of the work is part of a U.S. Fish and Wildlife (USFWS) Cooperative Recovery Initiative in the valley through the USFWS Partners Program.
Non-native crayfish and habitat deterioration of refuge populations of the Endangered Pahrump poolfish, Empetrichthys latos latos continue to be of a heightened concern; prompting concentrated and pointed habitat and restoration efforts at both Shoshone Ponds and Corn Creek Field Station. Conservation efforts in the form of two rotenone applications and the stabilization of a well were among some of activities providing further secure habitat for this taxon.
In Oasis Valley, habitat restoration in the Amargosa River corridor including the reconnection of a major spring outflow has provided improved habitat for the Amargosa toad Anaxyrus nelsoni and the native Oasis Valley speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus ssp. furthering the successes of Agency and local landowner cooperation.
In addition to these species updates, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service completed a Revised Draft Recovery Plan for the bull trout Salvelinus confluentus where the southernmost residing population occurs in the Jarbidge Mountains in northern Nevada. The draft focuses on effective management to bull trout and a de-emphazation on achieving target point estimates of abundance of adult bull trout in each core area. At Soldier Meadows, Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW) biologists conducted the first range-wide surveys for the Threatened desert dace Eremichthys acros in over 10 years to determine current status and abundance. In Ruby Valley, NDOW have continued efforts and monitoring of the relict dace Relictus solitarius in the three new transplant ponds created two years ago. An update on the population status of Moapa dace Moapa coriacea will be addressed as well. And, finally, in January, the U.S. Department of Interior honored long time native fish champion Gary Scoppettone (U.S. Geological Service biologist, retired) The Partners in Conservation Award, for helping land managers save two species of fish from extinction, the Cui-ui Chasmistes cujus and the Lahontan cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi , since 1981 Scoppettone has worked to provide the science that has allowed these fish to recover the endangered and tribally sacred desert fish at Pyramid Lake in northern Nevada.


Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Area
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 14:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 17:56:50

Title: Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility – Refuge Tank Ecosystem Monitoring Plan (RTEMP)

Authors:
Chaudoin, Ambre 1
Feuerbacher, Olin 2
Simons, Lee 2
Weissenfluh, Darrick 2
Linares-Casenave, Javier 2

Affiliations:
1. The Great Basin Institute – USFW- Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility
2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Abstract:
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is developing an Inventory and Monitoring Plan (IMP) for the large (100,000 gallon) refuge tank at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility (AMFCF). The IMP or “Refuge Tank Ecosystem and Monitoring Plan” (RTEMP) is funded by the USFWS&aposs Cooperative Recovery Initiative. The refuge tank houses one of two refuge populations of Devils Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) currently being established at AMFCF. The refuge tank has a shallow shelf and a deeper cavern area that simulate some of the unique features of the species&apos only native habitat (Devils Hole, Amargosa Valley, Nevada). Initial introduction of Devils Hole algae, cyanobacteria, and aquatic invertebrates into the refuge tank occurred in May and June 2013. Continuing additions of laboratory-cultured organisms derived from Devils Hole stock are intended to promote the establishment of a biological community that emulates the Devils Hole environment. Additional aspects of RTEMP are being initiated sequentially: water quality monitoring of dissolved oxygen (mg/L), pH, temperature (oC), and conductivity (mS/cm) in early 2013; benthic invertebrate surveys in August 2013; spectrophotometric analyses for total alkalinity, ammonia, nitrite, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, and sulfate in March 2014; monitoring of heterotrophic bacteria in March 2014; substrate mapping (algae, cyanobacteria, and abiotic substrate) in July 2014; and Mycobacteria spp. presence/absence testing in August 2014. The RTEMP will help AMFCF staff establish and maintain an ecosystem similar to Devils Hole and capable of sustaining a refuge population of 500 or more purebred C. diabolis.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 14:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 17:33:51

Title: Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility: Establishing a Devils Hole Pupfish Population

Authors:
Feuerbacher, Olin G 1
Weissenfluh, Darrick S 1
Chaudoin, Ambre L 2
Barlics , Robert M 2
Simons, Lee H 1
Linares-Casenave, Javier 1

Affiliations:
1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility
2. The Great Basin Institute, Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility

Abstract:
Recovery efforts for Devils Hole pupfish, Cyprinodon diabolis, at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility (AMFCF) have focused on establishing a captive population from eggs collected from Devils Hole. Eggs were recovered from Devils Hole using nylon spawning mops or carpeted tiles during November 2013 and January 2014. Mops and tiles were deployed 1-7 days on the shallow shelf and subsequently transported to AMFCF where they were inverted and agitated underwater to dislodge eggs and detritus. Recovered material was examined with microscopes to detect eggs. We recovered a total of 60 eggs and one larvae from Devils Hole. Only 65% (n=39) of the eggs contained viable developing embryos. Hatching rate was 55% (n=33) and survival to adulthood was 88% (n=29). Rearing methods included treatment of recovered eggs with formalin, malachite green, and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole, followed by incubation in acrylic hatching cones. Larvae were given probiotics upon first drinking, and fed a mix of infusoria, newly hatched Artemia, Zeigler larval diet, and crushed Rio Grande Silvery Minnow Chow. As fish grew, they were transitioned onto a gape-appropriate combination of frozen and dry feeds. Adult fish (n=29) were moved in May-June 2014 into a 100,000-gallon refuge tank designed to emulate the Devils Hole environment. Fish spawning behaviors have been observed frequently within the refuge tank and successful reproduction has been confirmed via snorkel survey. Three larvae over 10 mm TL and one larvae <10 mm TL were observed on August 15 and September 24, 2014, respectively. Efforts are now focused on improving the reproductive output and survival to adulthood of the captive population.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 14:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 16:48:20

Title: Effects of turbidity on predation vulnerability of juvenile humpback chub to rainbow trout and brown trout

Authors:
Morton-Starner, Rylan 1
Ward, David 1
Vaage, Ben 1

Affiliations:
1. USGS Southwest Biological Science Center

Abstract:
Predation on juvenile native fish by introduced rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and brown trout, Salmo trutta, is considered a significant threat to the persistence of endangered humpback chub, Gila cypha, in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. Diet studies of rainbow and brown trout collected from the confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers indicate the incidence of piscivory for trout in this area changes with turbidity but these relationships are not well understood. In overnight laboratory trials, we exposed hatchery-reared juvenile bonytail, Gila elegans, 60-70 mm TL, as a surrogate for humpback chub, to adult rainbow and brown trout, 190-400 mm TL, at turbidities ranging from 0 to 150 formazin nephlometric units (FNU) mixed from either Little Colorado River or Paria River mud. Our results indicate that turbidity as low as 50 FNU reduced predation vulnerability of bonytail to rainbow trout by 63 % (95% confidence interval = 43% – 82%). Predation vulnerability of bonytail to brown trout did not change significantly with turbidity up to 150 FNU. Relatively small changes in turbidity may be sufficient to alter predation dynamics of rainbow trout on humpback chub in the mainstem Colorado River and warrants further investigation as a fisheries management tool.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 16:41:12

Title: An evaluation of two new tools for removal of Quagga mussels from water conveyance systems

Authors:
Morton Starner, Rylan 1
Ward, David 1

Affiliations:
1. USGS Southwest Biological Science Center

Abstract:
It is well documented that quagga mussels, Dreissena bugensis, create numerous long lasting and detrimental impacts to water conveyance systems and plumbing infrastructure. Their prolific breeding and quick colonization makes controlling populations and preventing future spread difficult. Chlorine products are currently used to remove quagga mussels from infrastructure but chlorine is extremely toxic to non-target organisms and corrosive to equipment. In a controlled laboratory setting we evaluated two new treatments for suppression or eradication of adult quagga mussels. Treatments for evaluation were chosen based on their suitability for application in fish hatcheries and large water delivery or hydroelectric infrastructures, where having minimal effects on non-target organisms is desirable. Treatments of liquid ammonia (29 %) and salt (NaCl), were applied for 1-3 days at varying concentrations. Ammonia is a byproduct of fish metabolism, which natural bacteria in the environment detoxifies and salt up to 6 ppt has been demonstrated to be non-lethal to most freshwater fish. We found that 0.5 ml of ammonia (29 %) per liter of water and 6 ppt salt concentration applied for a minimum of three days resulted in less than one percent survival of adult quagga mussels.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 15:47:34

Title: Documentation of spawning by Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, in the lower Grand Canyon during 2014.

Authors:
Barkstedt, Judith M. 1
Barkalow, Adam L. 1
Brandenburg, W. Howard 1
Platania, Steven P. 1
Kegerries, Ron 2
Albrecht, Brandon 2
McKinstry, Mark 3

Affiliations:
1. ASIR and MSB
2. Bio-West
3. U.S. Bureau of reclamation

Abstract:
The Grand Canyon section of the Colorado River, from Glen Canyon Dam downstream to Pearce Ferry, supports federally endangered Gila cypha, Humpback Chub and Xyrauchen texanus, Razorback Sucker. Downstream of the Grand Canyon in Lake Mead, stable reproducing Razorback Sucker populations have been documented since 1996. Recent tracking of sonic-tagged adults and captures of larval Razorback Sucker by Bio-West in the Colorado River inflow of Lake Mead suggested this species might, at least seasonally, be expanding upstream of the lake and be using the lower Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. In 2014 a study was initiated to determine the distribution of adult, juvenile, and larval Razorback Sucker in the Grand Canyon.

The 100-mile long study area for the 2014 larval fish survey in the lower Grand Canyon began near Lava Falls (RM 179.2) and extended downstream to Pearce Ferry, at the Colorado River inflow into Lake Mead (RM 280). This section of river is characterized by a narrow river corridor with limited floodplain development, gradients alternating between steep rapids and long pools and runs, and substrata ranging from silt to bedrock. A general randomized tessellation stratified (GRTS) design was used to generate fish sampling locations for this study. This technique ensures spatially balanced samples and a robust statistical design. The 40 sampling locations generated for this project were sampled monthly (n = 6) from April through September 2014. The 240 larval fish sites sampled in the lower Grand Canyon during 2014 yielded 10 species and was numerically dominated by catostomids (>80% of cumulative sample). Noteworthy was the collection of over 450 larval Razorback Sucker in the lower Grand Canyon at over 20 unique sites during April and May. Collection locations of larval Razorback Sucker ranged from RM 179.1 (upper end of the study area) downstream to RM 279.1 (our lowermost sampling site). The 2014 larval fish study documented spawning of Razorback Sucker in the Grand Canyon thereby expanding the breeding range of this endangered fish and is another positive step towards recovery for this species.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 15:46:23

Title: Determination of the Dionda episcopa complex in Mexico

Authors:
Lambarri, Christian 1
Espinosa, Hector 1

Affiliations:
1. Colecci&#x000F3n Nacional de Peces, Instituto de Biologia UNAM

Abstract:
The species of the order Cypriniformes are the most diverse monophyletic group of freshwater fishes in the world. In Mexico the only representatives of the order belong to the subfamily Leuciscinae and are the most abundant in the North of the country. After the confirmation of the paraphilia of this subfamily it has been suggested that its origin resulted from several invasions from Europe to America or that this lineage was already established in Laurasia before the continents separated in the Palaeogen. The species Dionda episcopa has been considered as one single polytypic species that distributes from the Colorado river in Texas, to the west in the rio Grande and to the south in various rivers in Chihuahua and Durango, although some authors have noticed that the roundnose minnow is a complex of forms. The endorheic isolation of the populations and the morphology and mitochondrial DNA of the organisms determined as D. episcopa from several rivers of Chihuahua and Durango are actually one or more morphotypes different from the D. episcopa of the Pecos river.

Resumen:
Las especies del orden Cypriniformes constituyen el grupo monofilético de peces dulceacuícolas más grande del mundo. En México los únicos representantes de este orden pertenecen a la subfamilia Leuciscinae y son los peces más abundantes en el norte del país. Tras la confirmación de la parafilia de esta subfamilia se ha sugerido que su origen resultó de varias invasiones desde Europa hacia América o que este linaje ya estaba establecido en Laurasia antes de que los continentes se separaran en el Paleógeno. La especie Dionda episcopa se ha considerado una sola especie politípica que se distribuye desde el río Colorado en Texas, al oeste en el río Bravo y al sur hacia varios ríos de Chihuahua y Durango, aunque varios autores han notado que la carpa obispa es un complejo de formas. El aislamiento endorreico de las poblaciones, así como la morfología y el ADN mitocondrial de los organismos sugieren que las poblaciones determinadas como D. episcopa de varios afluentes del estado de Chihuahua y Durango son en realidad uno o más morfotipos distintos a D. episcopa del río Pecos, aún no descritos y miembros del complejo de la carpa obispa.

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Poster

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 14:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 15:33:07

Title: The status and conservation of the Gila Topminnow

Authors:
Duncan, Douglas K. 1
Timmons, Ross 2

Affiliations:
1. USFWS
2. Arizona Game and Fish Department

Abstract:
The Gila topminnow, Poeciliopsis occidentalis, was once considered the commonest fish in the Gila River basin. Due to the well-known and extensively documented threats of habitat desiccation and the release of exotic and nonnative fishes, this once common live-bearer was reduced to a few isolated populations, and listed as an endangered species in 1967.

Gila topminnow have been released over 200 times into mostly wild habitats (streams, springs, stock tanks, ponds), and more than 100 times into captive sites. These numbers include the initial and augmentation releases, and have been largely over the last 35 years. The releases have been facilitated by MOUs, Endangered Species Act Section 6 funding, Arizona Heritage Funds, the topminnow pupfish Safe Harbor Agreement, and the Gila River Basin Native Fish Conservation Program. Most releases were done by the Arizona Game and Fish Department, but have included numerous partners. The topminnow pupfish Safe Harbor Agreement has allowed the release of topminnow into lands that would normally not be available for native fish conservation.

Work on the revision to the 1983 recovery plan revision continues, with a public draft expected in 2015. We also plan on completing the five-year review for the Gila topminnow concurrently with the public draft of the recovery plan. The current conservation program is guided by the current draft revised recovery plan, which is the best-available information on the subject. We hope that the current robust conservation actions for the Gila topminnow could lead to down-listing in the foreseeable future. One strategy we have contemplated with a down-listing to threatened status is an Endangered Species Act 4d rule that would allow the use of Gila topminnow for vector control, instead of western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis.

Status of the species has improved with the recovery actions, but the threats that lead to the endangered status of the Gila topminnow continue. Drought, climate change, and increasing human populations still threaten streams and springs and nonnative and exotic species are still introduced and distributed across the landscape. An open-pit copper mine proposed near Tucson will impact Cienega Creek, home of the largest and most robust natural Gila topminnow population in the U.S. In addition, and another open-pit mine is proposed in Mexico near the Santa Cruz River. The spill from the mine near Cananea most certainly impacted topminnow in the Rio Sonora in Mexico.


Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 14:41:10

Title: An evaluation of sedatives for use in transport of native fishes

Authors:
Tennant, Laura 1
Ward, David 1

Affiliations:
1. USGS Southwest Biological Science Center

Abstract:
Sedated ornamental fish are commonly transported with minimal water in plastic bags filled with oxygen, but these same methods are rarely used for transportation of threatened or endangered fishes for conservation purposes. We evaluated the effectiveness of three common sedatives for use in holding native fish when minimal water weight is desirable, such as for transportation. Juvenile (70-90 mm) bonytail, Gila elegans, were subjected to three sedatives, AQUACALM (metomidate hydrochloride), TRICAINE-S (tricaine methanesulfonate or MS-222), and AQUI-S® 20E (eugenol). Fish were exposed to 0.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 mg/L of AQUACALM™; 0.0, 55.0, 60.0, 65.0, and 70.0 mg/L of TRICAINE-S; and 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mg/L of AQUI-S 20E. Fish were placed in plastic bags (8″x20″) filled with 1L of water and oxygen, at both low (n=5) and high densities (n=20). For each dose and density, we conducted three replicates, at 4-hour intervals until a 12-hour time period was reached. Of the three sedatives, AQUACALM was found to be highly variable in both induction and recovery times with high mortality rates. The optimum dose of TRICAINE-S for this application was 70.0 mg/L for both low and high densities of fish, although low mortality (5%) occurred in the high density treatment. AQUI-S 20E appears to be the best sedative we tested for holding small to large numbers of bonytail using these methods. A concentration of 1.0 mg/L exhibited good stress reducing capability, satisfactory induction and recovery times, and no mortalities at either low or high densities. Only one fish died in all of the control trails where no sedatives were used. This was unexpected and indicates holding fish using these methods without sedatives may be equally effective.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 14:30:05

Title: What environmental factors reduce predation vulnerability for native fishes?

Authors:
Vaage, Ben 1
Ward, David 1
Morton Starner, Rylan 1

Affiliations:
1. USGS Southwest Biological Science Center

Abstract:
The incompatibility of native Colorado River fishes and nonnative warm water fishes is well documented with predation by nonnative species causing rapid declines and even extirpation of native species in most locations. In a few rare instances native fishes are able to survive and recruit despite the presence of nonnative warm water fishes, indicating that specific environmental conditions may help reduce predation vulnerability. We experimented with turbidity, artificial water colorants, woody debris, aquatic vegetation, and rock substrates in a laboratory setting to determine if any of these types of cover could reduce predation vulnerability and confer survival advantages for juvenile bonytail, Gila elegans, (mean = 70 mm TL), roundtail chub, Gila robusta, (mean = 35 mm TL) and juvenile razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus (mean = 74 mm TL). Bonytail and razorback suckers were exposed to predation by adult largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus, and flathead catfish, Pylodictis olivaris, in overnight trials. Turbidity above 500 nephlometric turbidity units (NTU) reduced predation vulnerability by up to 50%, for the sight-feeding predators, but increased predation vulnerability to flathead catfish. No other treatment significantly reduced predation mortality. These results may help to explain patterns of wild juvenile razorback sucker recruitment at the turbid inflow of the Colorado River into Lake Mead, an area where flathead catfish are not currently present but other nonnative fishes are.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 15:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 14:20:31

Title: Eradication of invasive aquatic species using carbon dioxide and liquid ammonia

Authors:
Ward, David Lance 1
Morton Starner, Rylan 1
Vaage, Ben 1

Affiliations:
1. USGS Southwest Biological Science Center

Abstract:
Eradication of populations of nonnative aquatic species for the purpose of reintroducing native fish is often difficult because very few effective methods are available for removing aquatic organisms. This creates the need to evaluate new chemicals that could be used as management tools for native fish conservation. Carbon dioxide and ammonia are by-products of fish metabolism and are naturally present in the environment at low levels, yet are known to be toxic to most aquatic species. We evaluated the effectiveness of using carbon dioxide (baking soda + muratic acid) and liquid ammonia (29 %) as fisheries management tools in a series of small natural ponds in northern Arizona. Carbon dioxide (200 ppm) was effective at removing invasive green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus, and smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu, from small pools while allowing native roundtail chub, Gila robusta, to be captured and salvaged. Carbon dioxide however was not completely effective at removing invasive fishes as pond size increased and was not effective for removing northern crayfish, Orconectes virilis. The relatively large quantities of baking soda (1.5 g/3.78 liters) and muratic acid (2 ml/3.78 liters) required to impact fish likely limits this method of creating high carbon dioxide levels to smaller bodies of water (<37;9,000 liters). Ammonia was effective at eliminating green sunfish in a 2,840,000 liter earthen pond when dosed at 0.25 ml/3.78 liters, but crayfish eradication in a 2,100,000 liter earthen pond required 1.5 ml/3.78 liters to be effective. Liquid ammonia may provide a simple, cost-effective way to manage invasive aquatic species even in relatively large bodies of water with no harmful residues.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 15:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 13:31:55

Title: Large-bodied piscivore removal project from a warm water riverine system

Authors:
Crowder, Clayton D. 1
Robinson, Anthony T. 1

Affiliations:
1. Arizona Game and Fish Department

Abstract:
Fulfilling objectives identified in the multi-agency Blue River Native Fish Restoration Project to protect and restore the native fish assemblage within the Blue River drainage in eastern Arizona, personnel from Arizona Game and Fish Department completed four efforts to remove nonnative piscivorous fishes from an 18.6 km portion of the lower Blue River. Removal efforts occurred in June of 2009, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Snorkeling equipment, including spear fishing poles and guns, was used to target and remove large-bodied nonnative piscivorous fish (i.e., flathead Pylodictis olivaris and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus) and common carp Cyprinus carpio. In 2009, surveyors removed 70 channel catfish, 4 flathead catfish, and 1 common carp, and 3 rainbow trout, Onchorhyncus mykiss. Removal efforts resumed in June 2012, after a fish exclusion barrier was completed at the downstream end of the removal reach, and large-scale fish kills associated with the Wallow Fire of 2011 had occurred. Seven channel catfish were removed in 2012, three channel catfish in 2013, and surveyors did not detect any large-bodied piscivorous fish in 2014, indicating that this large-bodied piscivore removal project may have succeeded.

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 11:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 13:00:50

Title: Diversity and potential distribution of the fish fauna of the Sierra Madre Occidental

Authors:
Mendoza, Veronica 1

Affiliations:
1. Coleccion Nacional de Peces, Instituto de Biología, UNAM

Abstract:
The fish fauna inventory of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMOc) was carried out to understand its diversity and status. Current potential distribution and climate change scenarios for the years 2020, 2050 and 2080 (for endemic species) was modeled with Maximum Entropy Modeling (Maxent). The ichthyofauna inventory consists of 107 species (15 families), representing 21% of the Mexican freshwater fishes. Of these, 16 species are endemic to the SMOc and 28 have been introduced. Of the total of species are listed as follows: 27% threatened (A), 13% in danger of extinction (P), 5% under special protection (Pr) and 3% probably extinct in the wild (E). Alpha and gamma diversity of the SMOc are underestimated due to the lack of surveys in several watersheds. Beta diversity with Jaccard and Sorensen-Dice was calculated, these indicate that the endorheic basins Lago Babícora and Lago Bustillos are the systems with more shared species in the SMOc (IJ = 0.54545, IS = 0.70588 ). Finally, models executed by Maxent were optimal as the AUC values were found between 0.892-0.999, even for species with <10 occurrences insomuch as predicted between 50 and 100% presence in the localities of each species. In general, the distribution of the species is affected by future environmental conditions, as it decreases compared to the current modeled conditions. Although in some particular high areas of the SMOc, the future distribution is wider.
Keywords: Sierra Madre Occidental, fish, diversity, potential distribution, Maxent, climate change.


Resumen:
Se realizó el inventario de la fauna íctica de la Sierra Madre Occidental (SMOc) con el fin de conocer la diversidad y el estatus en la que se encuentra, además se modeló con Maxent la distribución potencial actual y ante escenarios de cambio climático para los años 2020, 2050 y 2080 (para especies endémicas). Hasta ahora la integran 107 especies (15 familias), representando el 21% de peces dulceacuícolas mexicanos. 16 especies son endémicas de la SMOc y 28 han sido introducidas. Del total de las especies, el 27% se encuentran en categoría amenazadas, el 13% en peligro de extinción, el 5% bajo protección especial y el 3% probablemente extinta en el medio silvestre. Se encontró que la diversidad alfa y gamma de la SMOc se encuentra subestimada debido a falta de muestreos en varias cuencas hidrográficas. Se calculó la diversidad beta con los índices de Jaccard y Sörensen-Dice los cuales indican que las cuencas endorreicas Lago Babícora y Lago Bustillos fueron los sistemas que más especies comparten (IJ= 0.54545, IS= 0.70588). Finamente los modelos realizador por Maxent fueron óptimos ya que los valores AUC se encontraron desde 0.892 hasta 0.999 aún para aquellas especies con <10 ocurrencias ya que predijo entre el 50 y el 100% de presencia en las localidades de cada especie. En general se ve afectada la distribución ante las condiciones ambientales futuras, ya que disminuye el área respecto a la modelada para condiciones actuales, en otros casos se nota el desplazamiento hacia las zonas más altas de la SMOc.
Palabras clave: Sierra Madre Occidental, ictiofauna, diversidad, distribución potencial, Maxent, Cambio Climático.


Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Miller

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 12:10:08

Title: Mitochondrial DNA variation in the pupfishes of Chihuahua, México

Authors:
Carson, Evan W. 1
Lozano-Vilano, Lourdes 2
Vela-Valladares, Lilia 3
Banda-Villanueva, Iris 3
Sepúlveda, Lissette 3
Contreras, Armando 2
De la Maza-Benignos, Mauricio 3

Affiliations:
1. Department of Biology and Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico
2. Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León
3. Pronatura Noreste, A. C.

Abstract:
Pupfishes (Cyprinodon) are an iconic and speciose, yet almost uniformly imperiled, group of desert fishes. Over 15% of described pupfish species (8 of ~50) are endemic or native to Chihuahua, México. These include C. eximius, C. julimes, C. macrolepis, C. pachycephalus, and C. salvadori of the Río Conchos basin; C. albivelis of the Río Yaqui basin (primarily); C. fontinalis of the endorheic Desierto de Samalayuca basin; and C. pisteri of the ríos Casas Grandes, Santa Maria, and Del Carmen basins of northern Chihuahua. Little is known about the status or particular biology, ecology, and genetic diversity of these species, though this information is crucial to their conservation, especially given the increasing threats from human activities and projected effects of climate change in the region. Through conservation awards from the Desert Fishes Council, Pronatura Noreste DFC, and the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund (for C. fontinalis only), we assessed mtDNA variation within all eight species and among populations of the three species that maintain multiple populations (C. eximius, C. pisteri, and C. salvadori); a single collection was obtained for C. albivelis, though other populations remain. This information is paired with population status updates obtained during field surveys conducted from 2011 through 2014. Discussion is centered on conservation management of each species.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 11:58:20

Title: A program for long-term genetic, habitat, and population monitoring of Cyprinodon fontinalis and associated species in Ojo Solo and the Ojo Caliente Refuge

Authors:
Carson, Evan W. 1
Lozano-Vilano, María de Lourdes 2
Vela-Valladares, Lilia 3
Contreras, Armando 2
Sepúlveda, Lissette 3
Banda-Villanueva, Iris 3
De la Maza-Benignos, Mauricio 3

Affiliations:
1. Department of Biology and Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico
2. Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León
3. Pronatura Noreste, A. C.

Abstract:
The Carbonera pupfish Cyprinodon fontinalis was known from nine springs in the municipality of Ahumada, Chihuahua. This pupfish was extirpated from all but one native spring, the failing Ojo Solo. Through a conservation project funded by awards from the Desert Fishes Council, the Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund, and Pronatura Noreste, we established a reproducing population of C. fontinalis at the nearby Ojo Caliente, a natural but disturbed habitat we further altered to mimic that of the native Ojo Solo. In this presentation, we chronicle the successful establishment of the refuge population of C. fontinalis; discuss the presumed establishment of a refuge population of the co-endemic Chihuahua Crayfish Cambarellus chihuahuae, which was assed previously as extinct; describe the bleak outlook for the critically endangered and co-endemic largemouth shiner C. bocagrande; and introduce preliminary information on new records and species of hydrobiid snails from the native and refuge habitats. We present data obtained from the first year of the long-term population and genetic monitoring program for conservation of C. fontinalis.


Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Poster

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 15:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 11:36:35

Title: Abundance and population dynamics of invasive northern pike, Esox lucius, Yampa River, Colorado, 2004-2010

Authors:
Zelasko, Koreen 1
Bestgen, Kevin 1
Hawkins, John 1
White, Gary 2

Affiliations:
1. Larval Fish Laboratory, Colorado State University
2. Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University

Abstract:
Northern pike, Esox lucius, is one of the most problematic invasive aquatic species in the Yampa River basin and an impediment to recovery of endangered fishes in the upper Colorado River basin. A long-term mechanical removal program was implemented in 2004 to reduce negative effects of northern pike, but population abundance and trends and efficacy of removal are not well understood. We analyzed mark-recapture records of 8,929 individual northern pike, 2004-2010, from three reaches of the Yampa River: upstream reach Hayden to Craig, HC (designated as a &#39buffer zone&#39 between upstream pike production areas and downstream native fish critical habitat); middle reach South Beach-Little Yampa Canyon-Juniper, SLJ; and downstream reach Maybell-Sunbeam. Survival rate estimates for average-length northern pike were highest in downstream reach MS, averaging 0.54 (range: 0.36-0.71) across annual time intervals, followed by middle reach SLJ (average: 0.32, range: 0.18-0.48), and then upstream reach HC (average: 0.25, range: 0.12-0.38). Annual abundance estimates followed the opposite pattern: highest each year in upstream HC (range: 1192-3951), followed by SLJ (659-2446), and lowest in downstream MS (range: 233-645). Years with highest abundance included 2004 and 2009 for all reaches. Population increases due to combined effects of recruitment and immigration, calculated as the difference between predicted abundance at the end of a survival interval and the abundance estimate for each subsequent year, averaged 496% in reach HC, 491% in reach SLJ, and 144% in reach MS. Analysis of length-frequency histograms suggested immigration of young age-classes of northern pike. For example, few or no individuals from 2007 and 2008 cohorts were captured in sampling of reaches HC and SLJ those years, but were more abundant than expected in 2009. Hence, those young northern pike likely moved in from another reach or off-channel source, and likely from upstream. Most young northern pike captured in those reaches were produced in 2004 and 2009, years with markedly different spring discharge peaks and flows; thus, the relationship between Yampa River flow patterns and pike spawning success and recruitment is unclear. Mark-recapture records also showed a preponderance of downstream movement. For example, of 394 northern pike that changed reaches during their capture histories, 90% of movements were to a downstream reach, either within the Yampa River or to the Green River. Northern pike demographic data showed that current removal efforts are inadequate to permanently reduce pike abundance in the Yampa River, mainly because recruitment and immigration exceeded removal and mortality. This was especially true in higher-density upstream reaches, where control efforts such as northern pike source management and spawning disruption are needed, in addition to increased removal, to reduce negative effects of pike. This information should allow managers to better evaluate the role of northern pike removal in the &#39buffer zone&#39 on populations in downstream critical habitat and explore more effective means to reduce pike abundance river-wide to assist with recovery of native fishes.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 16:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 11:28:54

Title: A review of drought adaptations in aquatic taxa: A buffer against climate change?

Authors:
Boersma, Kate S. 1

Affiliations:
1. University of San Diego, Department of Biology

Abstract:
Droughts in arid regions are increasing in frequency, intensity and duration, and these changes are predicted to threaten aquatic taxa. However, organisms inhabiting arid-land aquatic habitats are exposed to regular seasonal droughts and possess adaptations to survive short-term water shortage that may buffer populations against future drying. Unfortunately, relatively little is known about drought adaptations in arid-land aquatic taxa and thus we are unable to realistically predict population responses to future climate scenarios. Here I review the observational and experimental literature on adaptations to drying in five taxonomic groups (fish, amphibians, insects, crustaceans and molluscs) and identify commonalities across taxa. Adaptations fell into three main categories: behavioral, physiological, and phenological. Observational studies identified several commonalities, including drought escape behaviors such as burrowing and refuge use, high physiological tolerances for deteriorating water quality, and altered life history timing during drought years. In contrast, drought responses reported from manipulative experiments were much less uniform, both within and among taxa. These differences can in part be attributed to exactly which abiotic factors (e.g., water temperature, conductivity, water level) were manipulated by researchers in each of the experiments. Despite the paucity of literature and ongoing uncertainty over drought mechanisms, I argue that a synthesis across taxonomic groups is necessary in order to better predict biotic responses to intensifying drought regimes and identify future research directions.

Resumen:
Entra texto de resumen en español

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 15:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 11:13:57

Title: Phenotype predicts genotype for lineages of native cutthroat trout in the southern Rocky Mountains

Authors:
Bestgen, Kevin R. 1
Rogers, Kevin B. 2
Granger, Robert 1

Affiliations:
1. Colorado State University, Larval Fish Laboaratory
2. Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Abstract:
Morpho-meristic characteristics of cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii were described from 48 populations in the Rio Grande, and Colorado, South Platte, and Arkansas River basins in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico. These include presumptive Rio Grande (O. c. virginalis), Colorado River (O. c. pleuriticus), and greenback (O. c. stomias) cutthroat trout subspecies and the unusual Bear Creek, Colorado, population. Our main goal was to determine if phenotypes of individuals and populations, first assigned to lineages with mitochondrial DNA techniques, corresponded better to the subspecies recognized in the traditional Geographic Classification Model or to lineages under the newer Molecular Classification Model. Ten morpho-meristic characters, including scale, gill raker, and basibranchial tooth counts, as well as spot distribution and density patterns, were variable across taxa and discriminant function classification analyses better supported assignment of populations to the Molecular Model (90% correctly classified) than the Geographic Model (78% correctly classified). Bear Creek and Rio Grande lineages were distinct, as were Blue Lineage populations of the Upper Green River Basin. Green Lineage populations of the Colorado, Gunnison, and Dolores River drainages, as well as Front Range populations from the Arkansas and South Platte River drainages, were more difficult to classify and may represent more than one taxonomic entity. Classification success was also high within lineages at the drainage basin scale, suggesting smaller-scale organization of diversity. All lineages are rare and findings will be useful to managers tasked with listing decisions and conservation actions for these cutthroat trout.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 11:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-30 09:18:03

Title: Desert fishes research and management in Texas during 2014

Authors:
Garrett, Gary P. 1
Bean, Megan 2
Edwards, Bob 3
Montagne, Mike 4
Hendrickson, Dean A. 1

Affiliations:
1. University of Texas Austin, Texas Natural History Collections
2. Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept
3. University of Texas – Pan Am
4. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Abstract:
Updates on a variety of desert fishes work in Texas will be provided. These include a new refuge habitat for Pecos Pupfish, Cyprinodon pecosensis, new threats and protective efforts underway for Leon Springs Pupfish, C. bovinus, and initial assessments of habitat in McKittrick Creek, Guadalupe Mountains, to determine feasibility of establishing a population of Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout, Oncorhynchus clarki virginalis. Additionally, the University of Texas-based Fishes of Texas (FoTX) Project has continued to provide new insights into the history and conservation status of the Texas fish fauna and recently greatly increased its online fish occurrence data offerings. FoTX and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department also recently extended their collaboration to continue compiling and serving fish conservation-relevant data to researchers and the public.

Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Area
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 10:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 23:42:42

Title: Upper Colorado Basin Area Report

Authors:
Badame, Paul 1
Wilson, Krissy 1

Affiliations:
1. Utah Divivision Wildlife Resources

Abstract:
Activities continue in an effort to improve the status of many native fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin. These activities are guided principally by four programs: the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program, the San Juan River Basin Recovery Implementation Program, the Range-wide Conservation Agreement for the Colorado River Cutthroat Trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus and the Range-wide Conservation Agreement and Strategy for the roundtail chub, Gila robusta, bluehead sucker, Catostomus discobolus and flannelmouth sucker, C. latipinnis. The two recovery programs, which collectively work towards the recovery of Colorado pikeminnow, Ptychocheilus lucius, razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus bonytail, G. elegans and humpback chub, G. cypha use the protection of in-stream flow, habitat restoration, nonnative fish control, propagation, life history monitoring, and information and education to bring benefits to the four “big river fishes.” A summary of the recently completed “Sufficient Progress Reports” for both the San Juan and upper Colorado River Recovery programs will be presented. Tasks to assist the species under Conservation Agreements included multiple remote sensing projects to determine native fish utilization of tributaries throughout the basin; tamarisk control and other habitat restoration; distribution and density monitoring throughout their ranges; and renovation of trout streams and reintroduction of the Colorado River cutthroat trout continues in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Area
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 10:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 18:38:07

Title: The effects of river channel restoration on early juvenile fishes and meiofauna of the Pecos River, New Mexico

Authors:
Mecham, Darrel 1
Hoagstrom, Christopher 2
Graeb, Brian 1

Affiliations:
1. South Dakota State University
2. Weber State University

Abstract:
Slackwater habitats function as nursery areas for early-life-stages fishes and are critical for their growth and survival. Channelization can reduce slackwater availability by reducing channel complexity. Because of this, river channel restoration efforts have become more common and have been utilized to increase slackwater availability. We compared slackwater habitat conditions, early juvenile fish density, epibenthic meiofauna density, and fish and epibenthic meiofauna assemblage composition of a recently restored reach of the Pecos River, New Mexico with unchannelized and channelized reaches. We also assessed the relationship between flow regime and estimated hatch dates of common fish species including Red shiner (Cyrpinella lutrensis), Plains killifish (Fundulus zebrinus), and Western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). The availability and extent of slackwater habitat was greater in unchannelized reaches and lower in the restored and channelized reaches. Densities of F. zebrinus were greatest in unchannelized reaches upstream and decreased as the river becomes more channelized downstream. G. affinis exhibited the opposite trend, showing low densities upstream in the unchannelized reaches and increasing densities in the lower more channelized reaches. Densities of C. lutrensis were highest in more perennial reaches regardless of channel morphology. Total meiofauna density was also greatest in more perennial reaches. Rotifera densities were greatest in unchannelized reaches, while Ostracoda densities were greatest in channelized reaches. Both fish and epibenthic meiofauna assemblages of the restored reach were more similar to assemblages of channelized reaches, despite temporal differences. The common fish species spawned and hatched during periods of lower discharge. We suggest that future restoration efforts should focus on maintaining sufficient base-flows in addition to physical channel restoration. Maintenance of base-flows contributes to the provision of more extensive and abundant slackwater nursery areas within the restored river channel conducive to the growth and survival of early juvenile fishes.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 11:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 15:50:47

Title: Bonneville Basin Area Report

Authors:
Mellon, Cassie D 1
Wilson, Krissy 1
Slater, Mike 1
Cavalli, Pete 2

Affiliations:
1. Utah Division of Wildlife
2. Wyoming Game and Fish Department

Abstract:
The 2014 Bonneville Basin Area Report will provide an overview of activities and accomplishments for native aquatic species in the Bonneville Basin. This will include least chub, Iotichthys phlegethontis, which was just withdrawn from the candidate list by the Fish and Wildlife Service in August 2014. Activities for Bonneville cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii utah, will highlight a reintroduction into Mill Creek in Salt Lake County, Utah. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR) biologists are working to address limiting factors in the Weber River for a potentially unique species of bluehead sucker, Catostomus discobolus, in the Weber and Bear River drainages. The June Sucker (Chasmistes liorus) Recovery Program is continuing to work to remove common carp, Cyprinus carpio, from Utah Lake and is working to restore the Provo River delta to create habitat and increase survival of larval June sucker. The southern leatherside chub, Lepidomeda aliciae, has been reintroduced into multiple locations usually in tandem with Bonneville cutthroat trout restoration and reintroduction projects. Habitat restoration on Main Creek has created diverse complex habitat which should benefit southern leatherside chub. UDWR is working to propagate northern leatherside chub, Lepidomeda copei, to provide a source of fish for future introductions in northern Utah. These will also primarily be in partnership with Bonneville cutthroat restoration and reintroduction. Wyoming Game and Fish Department is working with partners on culvert removal and sediment reduction work to improve habitat for Bonneville cutthroat trout and other native fish.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Area
Student Award: No

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Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 15:46:41

Title:

Authors:
Mecham, Darrel 1

Affiliations:
1. South Dakota State University

Abstract:
Enter abstract text (English);

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 10:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 15:45:39

Title: Conservation success for least chub, Iotichthys phlegethontis, through introductions and habitat restoration

Authors:
Mellon, Cassie D 1
Lorig, Rebecca 2
Jimenez, Justin 3
Crockett, Chris 1
Wheeler, Kevin 1
Thompson, Paul 1
Tuttle, Phil 1
Wilson, Krissy 1

Affiliations:
1. Utah Division of Wildlife
2. United States Fish and Wildlife Service
3. Bureau of Land Management

Abstract:
The least chub, Iotichthys phlegethontis, is a small cyprinid endemic to the Bonneville Basin of Utah and naturally remains in only six locations. Least chub have been managed as a state sensitive species and under a voluntary multi-agency conservation agreement and strategy since 1998. Least chub has been petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) multiple times. In 2010 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) determined least chub was warranted but precluded which placed it on the candidate list. In 2014, FWS determined that ESA protection was no longer warranted for least chub and withdrew it from the candidate list. There are multiple factors that changed since 2010 which resulted in this decision. This includes conservation actions taken by the least chub conservation team (Team) which included: establishing refuge populations and reintroducing least chub in its historic range, habitat restoration work, grazing management, restoring and maintaining hydrologic connectivity, and controlling non-native species. The Team has worked with multiple landowners and has introduced least chub into over 30 locations with 10 considered secure and viable refuge populations. These include locations on private land, Bureau of Land Management Land (BLM), Department of Defense (DoD), Utah State Parks, and a local elementary school. While many of these populations were established in 2010, the introduced populations were not considered in the FWS decision at that time. Since that time, the Team established criteria defining a secure refuge population and established goals for the desired number of secure refuge populations. These conservation actions plus establishment of multiple successful refuge populations resulted in successful conservation of least chub.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 10:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 15:21:27

Title: Native Fish Translocations in Arizona, 2007 through 2014

Authors:
Robinson, Anthony T. 1

Affiliations:
1. AZ Game & Fish Dept.

Abstract:
During 2007 through 2014, Arizona Game and Fish Department completed 248 stockings of warm-water native fishes into 112 locations. Species were often stocked multiple times into each system to improve the chances that populations would establish. Most of the locations were stocked to establish new populations, but a few, particularly for razorback sucker, Xyrauchen texanus and Colorado pikeminnow, Ptychocheilus lucius, were augmentation programs. The number of new translocation sites varied greatly among species: 1 razorback sucker, 1 Little Colorado sucker Catostomussp., 1 Sonora sucker, Catostomus insignis, 1 desert sucker, Catostomus clarki, 1 speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus, 1 woundfin, Plagopterus argentissimus, 1 bonytail chub, Gila elegans, 1 Yaqui chub Gila purpurea, 2 humpback chub, Gila cypha, 2 Little Colorado spinedace, Lepidomeda vittata, 2 bluehead sucker Catostomus discobolus, 3 longfin dace, Agosia chrysogaster, 4 Gila chub, Gila intermedia, 4 loach minnow, Rhinichthys cobitis, 5 spikedace, Meda fulgida, 10 roundtail chub, Gila robusta, 43 desert pupfish, Cyprinodon macularius, and 49 Gila topminnow, Poeciliopsis occidentalis. Species successfully established populations in most, but not in all locations, likely for a variety of reasons. A few sites thought to be perennial, dried out and hence the fish did not survive. Flooding caused the extirpation of a few populations. Cold winter-time water temperatures likely contributed to the extirpation of at least one Gila topminnow population. Negative interactions with other species may also have contributed to extirpation of a few desert pupfish and Gila topminnow populations.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 16:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 15:02:35

Title: Inbreeding depression and genetic rescue reflected in variance in parentage in cutthroat trout

Authors:
Love Stowell, Sierra 1
Rogers, Kevin 2
Martin, Andrew 1

Affiliations:
1. University of Colorado
2. Colorado Division of Parks & Wildlife

Abstract:
The cold, swift waters of Colorado were once home to a diverse clade of cutthroat trout, but at least three of those lineages have gone extinct. A fourth lineage is on the brink: the greenback cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii stomias, persists as single population of fewer than 800 individuals in a small stream in the Arkansas drainage, outside of its native range in the South Platte drainage. This population, Bear Creek (WBC), is morphologically and genetically distinct from other cutthroat trout lineages. WBC trout are being propagated in a state fish hatchery with the intent of reestablishing wild populations within the South Platte drainage. The hatchery population has passed through at least two recent population bottlenecks: first during the founding of the wild population and subsequently during the establishment of the hatchery population. Genetic analysis of shows depleted genetic diversity, and reduced fitness is common in the hatchery population, both suggestive of inbreeding depression (ID). To determine the extent of inbreeding and ID in WBC and to assess the potential for genetic rescue, we used a combination of reciprocal crosses and a genotyping-by-sequencing approach to generate lineage-specific SNPs. We performed three crosses: between two WBC parents, between two parents from another cutthroat trout subspecies native to west of the Continental Divide (CAR), and between WBC and CAR parents. We measured survival and growth of all offspring in a common environment and collected all individuals that died during development. We extracted and barcoded DNA from all parents and a subset of the offspring, including individuals that died as eggs and fry and those that survived to fingerlings. Using a reduced representation library from the pooled samples sequenced with a 2×300 Illumina MiSeq run, we found several hundred SNPs between the two lineages, and multiple SNPs that allowed assignment of parentage to the offspring. We found that outbred offspring show significantly higher fitness than inbred offspring, suggesting recovery from inbreeding depression by genetic rescue. Intriguingly, not all parents in the cross contributed equally to the pool of surviving offspring. Future work on subsequent generations will demonstrate whether heterosis and the effects of genetic rescue persist after sexual reproduction disrupts interacting gene complexes. In general, the quantification of inbreeding depression and, potentially the identification of genomic regions and individual genes involved in inbreeding, can be used to plan genetic rescue and breeding efforts in a diversity of taxa threatened by small population size.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-29 08:17:31

Title: Movement and habitat associations of sonic-tagged juvenile Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, in Lake Mead, Nevada, U.S.A.

Authors:
Rogers, Ronald 1
Shattuck, Zachary 1
Albrecht, Brandon 1

Affiliations:
1. BIO-WEST, Inc.

Abstract:
Through 18 years of study (1996-2014), the Lake Mead population of Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, has been documented to exhibit natural recruitment. More recently (2007-2014), 72 sexually immature (juvenile) Razorback Suckers, less than 450 mm total length, have been collected in efforts associated with adult Razorback Sucker monitoring throughout Lake Mead. With a unique opportunity to study young individuals, efforts specifically targeting juvenile Razorback Sucker in Lake Mead (Las Vegas Bay, Echo Bay, the Virgin River/Muddy River inflow area) were aimed at better understanding the factors related to their recruitment. Movement and habitat association data were collected for sonic-tagged juvenile Razorback Suckers on a monthly basis during May 2013-April 2014; with additional seasonal fish community composition data collected weekly, May 2013-July 2013. These efforts helped to define seasonal habitat associations of sonic-tagged individuals through the quantification of physicochemical attributes (temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, conductivity, pH, turbidity, and depth), and the qualitative assessment of inundated cover and substrate (type and percent composition). In the collection of the associated fish community, a number of different gears (trammel nets, hoop nets, minnow traps, and seines) were used to sample for other conspecifics. Following this approach, a total of 13 species were captured, including unmarked, wild, Razorback Suckers in direct relationship with sonic-tagged juvenile individuals. These efforts were employed for a second season with monthly habitat sampling efforts (May 2014-April 2015), and weekly fish community sampling efforts (September-November 2014). Continued research focusing on this life stage will add insight to the naturally recruiting population and potential bottlenecks of juvenile Razorback Sucker in Lake Mead, with conservation applications for the species throughout the Colorado River basin.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 11:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-28 15:26:42

Title: Thermal effects on body size and stoichiometry: A case study in a desert spring fish, Gambusia marshi

Authors:
Moody, Eric 1
Corman, Jessica 1
Espinosa-Perez, Hector 2
Ramos, Jorge 1
Elser, James 1

Affiliations:
1. Arizona State University
2. Universidad Nacional Autonomo de Mexico

Abstract:
Organisms reared at cooler temperatures tend to mature at larger sizes than warm-reared conspecifics. As body size is an important trait that influences many metabolic processes including the storage and recycling of nutrients by consumers, examining the linkages between temperature, body size, and organismal stoichiometry can improve our mechanistic understanding of how organismal traits affect ecosystem function. We tested whether temperature affects adult body size and in turn the stoichiometric ratios of fish bodies and excretion in the poeciliid fish Gambusia marshi. We conducted this study in the Cuatro Ciénegas basin in Coahuila, Mexico, where G. marshi inhabit spring pools (pozas) which are thermally stable but individually range in temperature from 25-33 °C. Among eight pozas, we found a significant decline in adult female body mass with increasing water temperature. Body %P increased with body mass across all sites, but separate analysis of cooler (<27 °C) and warmer (>29 °C) springs revealed a greater intercept and slope for warmer populations. Body %C decreased with body mass at warmer sites but was not significantly related to body mass at cooler sites, and %N was unrelated to body mass among all sites. Individually, excretion rates of both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) increased with fish mass. Contrary to predictions, the N:P ratio of excreted nutrients decreased with body mass in warmer springs and did not change significantly with body mass in cooler springs. Our results suggest that changing mean temperature can alter the storage of nutrients in fishes due to the size-specific relationships of C and P contents, but that other factors such as changes in diet quality are more important to driving variance in excretion ratios among sites.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Hubbs

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 16:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-26 15:01:04

Title: The stoneflies of Saguaro National Park: &#34drought-proof survivalists&#34 or &#34canaries in the climate-change coal mine&#34?

Authors:
Bogan, Michael 1

Affiliations:
1. Univ California Berkeley, Dept Environmental Science, Policy & Management

Abstract:
Stoneflies (Plecoptera) are usually associated with cold, clean water, and are often used as sentinel species in stream health assessment. Despite their frequent association with cold water, some stoneflies can also be found in desert regions. While Saguaro National Park (SNP) was designated to preserve Sonoran Desert vegetation, the park also supports many kilometers of intermittent streams and a few perennial water sources. Little is known about the aquatic invertebrates of SNP, including the distribution of stoneflies in the park. In 2012 and 2013, I surveyed aquatic invertebrate communities at 24 intermittent and perennial stream reaches in SNP, with an emphasis on documenting the distribution of sensitive stonefly species. I found over 100 aquatic invertebrate taxa in SNP, including four stonefly species. The stoneflies Mesocapnia arizonensis and Capnia californica were found in intermittently-flowing reaches of streams throughout the park. Both are known to have desiccation-resistant diapause stages that confer survival through dry periods, including for multiple consecutive dry years. The other two species, Capnia decepta and Malenka coloradensis, were restricted to ~100m of stream at Manning Camp, the park&#39s highest elevation perennial water source. Both of these species, along with a suite of co-occurring caddisfly and mayfly species, are drought-intolerant and are at risk of being lost from SNP if Manning Camp Spring were to dry. Several other stonefly taxa (e.g. Chloroperlidae, Perlidae) occur at similar elevations in neighboring mountain ranges with more perennial water than SNP, suggesting that the current stonefly assemblage of the park is fairly depauperate. Thus the stonefly fauna of SNP includes both &#34drought-proof survivalists&#34 (e.g. Mesocapnia arizonensis) and &#34canaries in the climate-change coal mine&#34 (e.g. Malenka coloradensis), and populations of the latter should be closely monitored.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 11:30:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-25 10:42:27

Title: Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, telemetry and small-bodied fish community sampling in the Lower Grand Canyon, Arizona

Authors:
Kegerries, Ron 1
Albrecht, Brandon 1
Barkstedt, Judith M. 2
Brandenburg, W. Howard 2
Barkalow, Adam L. 2
Platania, Steven 2
McKinstry, Mark 3
Healy, Brian 4

Affiliations:
1. BIO/WEST
2. American Southwest Ichthyological Researchers, LLC (ASIR)
3. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region
4. National Park Service
5. Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program

Abstract:
Movement of sonic-tagged Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus , between the Colorado River inflow area of Lake Mead (CRI) and the lower Grand Canyon (LGC) has been documented since 2011. In 2013 sonic-tagged fish were located as far upstream as Spencer Creek (River Mile [RM] 246) and near wild, adult Razorback Suckers captured in 2012 and 2013. As part of a larger study, sonic telemetry and small-bodied fish community sampling was conducted throughout the LGC from Lava Falls (RM 180) downstream to Pearce Ferry (RM 280). Since telemetry efforts began at the CRI in 2010, 19 sonic-tagged fish have been released within the inflow portion of Lake Mead. In 2013, 10 sonic-tagged Razorback Sucker were released near Separation Canyon (RM 240). For this study, nine additional sonic-tagged Razorback Suckers were released just below Lava Falls (RM 180) in March 2014. A total of seven trips were conducted for submersible ultrasonic receiver (SUR) installation, tracking, and small-bodied sampling. A total of 25 sonic-tagged Razorback Sucker were contacted; three of which were originally released in the Colorado River inflow area and contacted within the lower Grand Canyon. Additionally, two sonic-tagged fish originally released in the lower Grand Canyon were found below Pearce Ferry and into the CRI. Small-bodied fish sampling revealed the strong presence of native fish throughout the LGC; however, no Razorback Suckers were captured via small-bodied seining in 2014.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-25 10:20:44

Title:

Authors:
Kegerries, Ron 1
Albrecht, Brandon 1
Barkstedt, Judith M. 2
Brandenberg, Howard W. 2
Barkalow, Adam L. 2
Platania, Steven 2
McKinstry, Mark 3
Healy, Brian 4

Affiliations:
1. BIO/WEST
2. American Southwest Ichthyological Researchers, LLC (ASIR)
3. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region
4. National Park Service
5. Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation

Abstract:
Enter abstract text (English);

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 16:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-23 11:08:09

Title: Oregon / Northern California Area Report, November 2014

Authors:
Scheerer, Paul 1
Leal, Jimmy 2
Banks, David 1
Hoekzema, Kendra 3
Schreder, Marci 4
Brandt, Troy 5
Reid, Stewart 6
Divine, Paul 7

Affiliations:
1. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
2. Bureau of Land Management
3. Oregon State University
4. Lake County Watershed Council
5. River Design Group
6. Western Fishes
7. California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Abstract:
The northwestern extreme of the desert region includes several endorheic drainage subbasins in Oregon, northeastern California, and northwestern Nevada (Fort Rock, Chewaucan, Goose, Warner, Catlow, Alvord, Malheur Lakes, Coyote Lakes, and Quinn). This region supports remnant fish faunas that once inhabited extensive pluvial Pleistocene lakes.
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: 1) estimated Warner sucker, Catostomus warnerensis, abundance in the Twentymile Creek subbasin and PIT tagged suckers to assess future passage at a fish ladder that is being reconstructed this fall, 2) obtained a population estimate and evaluated habitat conditions for Foskett speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus ssp., in Foskett and Dace Springs (in cooperation with BLM), 3) evaluated habitat conditions for Borax Lake chub, Gila boraxobius, at Borax lake from shoreline surveys, photo points, temperature and water level monitoring.
Jimmy Leal, BLM, continued ongoing habitat restoration at Foskett Spring for Foskett speckled dace, including the hand excavation of three new pools in the spring brook, thinning of aquatic vegetation from the spring pool and in four of the eight pools dug in 2013 in the tule and cattail marshes. BLM conducted photo point and water quality monitoring at Foskett and Dace Springs. BLM also completed a project to improve a road crossing (to reduce erosion/sedimentation) in the Warner (Deep Creek) basin, completed photo point monitoring of all fish bearing streams in the Warner basin, was actively involved in the replacement of a passage structure for Warner suckers in the Twentymile Creek subbasin (in cooperation with the watershed council and River Design Group), and has secured additional funds ($165K) for the next phase of the Honey Creek passage and screening project to benefit Warner suckers and redband trout (6 unscreened and unladdered diversions remain to be completed).

Dave Banks (ODFW) and Marci Schreder (Lake County Watershed Council) worked with landowners in the Honey Creek subbasin to initiate fish passage and screening projects for Warner suckers. Unfortunately due to drought conditions, ODFW was unable to install fish screens on the recently (2013) constructed passage structure on Honey Creek. Flow measurements into the irrigation ditches need to be measured before the engineers can design the appropriate screens.

Kendra Hoekzema and Dr. Brian Sidlauskis (OSU), in collaboration with BLM and ODFW, completed a study of species limits and population structure in speckled daces across the arid drainages of Oregon using phylogenetics, microsatellite analysis, and morphometrics. The work included a systematic assessment of the taxonomic status of the threatened Foskett speckled dace, revealed patterns of genetic connectivity across the landscape, and tested for the presence of cryptic species or subspecies. They concluded that Foskett Speckled is not a distinct species or subspecies (not monophyletic with either mtDNA or nuclear DNA), but the microsatellites identified them as a distinct population with distinct morphology and recommended they be labeled an Ecologically Significant Unit (ESU). They also sampled dace from Klamath Basin (including Duncan Spring) and Owyhee basin (including Rinehart Spring) and found a consistent morphological difference between dace from springs and streams.

Marci Schreder, Lake County Watershed Council, and Troy Brandt, River Design Group, completed several watershed enhancement projects in the Warner, Goose Lake, and Chewaucan subbasins focusing on fish passage and stream bank stabilization for native fishes.

Stewart Reids (Western Fishes) diligent efforts in the Goose Lake Basin resulted in the proposal to delist the Modoc Sucker in February 2014. Stewart continued bullfrog eradication in Turner Creek (Modoc Sucker habitats) and has been learning a lot about frog diets.

Paul Divine, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted drought monitoring on streams in the Goose Lake, Surprise Valley, and South Fork Pit River drainages to assess impacts to native fishes. Stream flow was monitored bi-weekly to track stream flow trends and assess the need for potential fish relocations.

Jim Capurso, USFS, organized a field trip where twenty fish biologists convened at the Blitzen River in southeast Oregon for the second annual Oregon Chapter American Fisheries Society (ORAFS) Native Fish Committee Non-Game Native Fish Workshop. The 2014 featured species were the Blitzen River whitefish and the Borax Lake chub. The goal of the annual workshops is to focus on non-game native fishes in their natural habitats and discuss their biology, habitat requirements, and conservation.
sh);

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Area
Student Award: No

Comments:




Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-23 10:55:42

Title: Morphological variation of Mountain Mullet, Agonostomus monticola, (Teleostei: Mugilidae) in the Mexican Pacific drainages

Authors:
Diaz-Murillo, B.P. 1
Ruiz-Campos, G. 2
Garcia-De Leon, F.J. 3
Camarena-Rosales, F. 2

Affiliations:
1. Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California
2. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California
3. Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas del Noroeste, A.C.

Abstract:
The morphological variation (meristic and morphometric) of the Mountain Mullet, Agonostomus monticola, (Bancroft, 1857) was evaluated in populations from the Mexican Pacific drainage, based on 36 body distances and eight meristic characters of 192 adult specimens. Discriminant function analysis yielded 21 morphometric and four meristic characters to be significant in variation, of which eight showed a tendency of geographical variation among populations. Based on the squared Mahalanobis´ distances of the standardized morphometric values, a large group of populations was formed by those individuals from the Suchiate, Verde, María García, Presidio, Piaxtla, Fuerte, Baluarte, Sinaloa, Ameca and Tomatlán basins; while other three basins (La Paz, Pitillial and Los Arcos) were classified as discrete unities.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2011-11-20 17:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-22 06:49:54

Title: Historical and current status of the Yaqui catfish, Ictalurus pricei, in Arizona, with a report on the 2014 propagation efforts.

Authors:
Minckley, C.O. 1
Ward, David 1

Affiliations:
1. Cuenca Los Ojos
2. USGS Southwest Biologic Science Center

Abstract:
The Yaqui catfish,Ictalurus pricei, is a threatened species in the United States and is endangered in Mexico.
This presentation summaries efforts made to recover this species in the United States, including information on the propagation effort made at the Arizona-Sonora museum and on the Coronado Ranch, Arizona in 2014.

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Presentation Type: Poster
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 10:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-19 11:38:18

Title: Springs as sentinels: rapid biodiversity assessments in an era of global ecological change

Authors:
Paulson, Abbey 1
Martin, Andrew 1

Affiliations:
1. University of Colorado – Boulder

Abstract:
Water in the desert has always been a rare and invaluable resource, but in the American Southwest it has become ever more so with increased aquifer pumping, river diversions, aquatic invasions, and regional predictions of a warmer, drier future. In the face of these drivers of global change, the persistence of desert spring systems and the unique biota they harbor has become a major conservation concern. The effects of the aforementioned phenomena on the ecosystems of desert springs are indirect, through habitat loss or degradation from reduced water levels and flow rates, and direct, through predation and competition posed by aquatic invaders such as crayfish and bullfrogs. The imperiled future of native and endemic biota found in desert spring systems and associated habitats highlights the need for baseline biodiversity surveys, as well as an efficient tool to conduct such surveys, to enable tracking of changes in community compositions. To facilitate rapid characterization of whole-ecosystem communities, we employed environmental DNA (eDNA) survey methods to assess compositions of bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaeans in the springs of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada. This survey method provides a snapshot of biotic assemblages across the tree of life, using minimally invasive sampling techniques, and bioinformatic tools to analyze large amounts of DNA data (> 10 million sequences) generated through massively-parallel sequencing. This research provides baseline biodiversity information for tracking ecological change in Ash Meadows, and also exists as a case study for timely and cost-effective biodiversity assessments in threatened spring systems throughout the region.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: Hubbs

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 10:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-19 11:29:49

Title: Little fish big river – dam operations and fish life history

Authors:
Rogowski, David L. 1

Affiliations:
1. Arizona Game and Fish Department

Abstract:
Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River in Northern Arizona was completed in 1966. The resulting cold water releases created a Blue Ribbon rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, tailwater fishery below the dam. From the 1970-1980s it was known for trophy size rainbow trout, however over time fewer large fish have been captured during standardized electrofishing surveys. In addition, median size of ripe fish has also significantly declined. This change in life history of rainbow trout is believed to be in response to modifications to Glen Canyon Dam operations. Initially Glen Canyon Dam was operated in response to power demands resulting in fluctuations in water of 4.5 m within a day. There was little natural reproduction occurring, therefore rainbow trout were stocked to sustain the fishery. In 1991 operations at the dam were significantly changed in response to environmental and cultural concerns. Variance in flows was significantly reduced. By the mid-1990s most rainbow trout within the system were naturally produced and stocking ceased in 1998. Since then, angler catch rates have increased to an all-time high (~2 fish/hour); however the number of large fish has declined. It is believed that the reduction in variance of flow (volume of water) accounts for this life history shift. Flow variance is positively correlated with median length of ripe male rainbow trout, as well as percent of large fish (>456 mm) captured during electrofishing surveys. Consistent flow levels have allowed rainbow trout to naturally reproduce every year, thereby increasing the density and competition for a limited food base, and consequently selecting for a fish that matures and reproduces early resulting in smaller fish.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 11:15:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-18 11:09:14

Title: Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus, Research and Monitoring in the Colorado River Inflow Area of Lake Mead and the Lower Grand Canyon, Arizona and Nevada

Authors:
Albrecht, Brandon 1

Affiliations:
1. BIO-WEST, Inc.

Abstract:
Based on past studies and recent movements of sonic-tagged Razorback Suckers from Lake Mead into the lower Grand Canyon (LGC) section of the Colorado River, questions regarding this population have spurred further interest into the presence of wild individuals and their relationship between the river and reservoir. For more than 20 years, Razorback Suckers were thought to be extirpated within the Grand Canyon. This collaborative and holistic study included efforts to continue monitoring of Razorback Sucker (all life stages) within the Colorado River inflow of Lake Mead (CRI) coupled with the recent inclusion of sonic telemetry, small-bodied fish community, and larval fish community sampling from Lava Falls downstream to Pearce Ferry, in the LGC (RM 180-280). The specific objectives outlined for these efforts include; (1) conducting larval and small-bodied fish studies to quantitatively assess annual fish reproduction, spawning, and nursery areas in the LGC, (2) determine if Razorback Suckers are present in the study area and if they associate with habitat found within the LGC through telemetry and opportunistic adult sampling, and (3) to help determine habitat associations, relative spawning and reproductive effort, and population trends of Razorback Sucker in the CRI and LGC. Specifically, this paper will provide an overview for this work and will cover findings from the CRI portion of this multi-faceted study, particularly regarding natural recruitment observed within this population. Subsequent papers will provide specific insights into the telemetry and small-bodied fish community sampling, as well as findings to date from the larval fish community sampling in the LGC.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 10:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-16 15:28:51

Title: Restoration of the Relict Leopard Frog, Lithobates onca

Authors:
Haley, Ross 1
Jaeger, Jef 2
Rivera, Rebeca 2

Affiliations:
1. National Park Service
2. University of Nevada Las Vegas

Abstract:
The relict leopard frog, Lithobates onca, was first described in 1875, and was believed to have gone extinct in about 1950 until its re-discovery 41 years later (1991) at three small springs within Lake Mead NRA. Subsequent searches found them in three additional springs inside the park and one outside. By 1994, however, the population outside the park was gone as well as the population at the site of the original discovery within the park. Numbers of frogs at the remaining sites were critically low, and the habitats were small. The Park initiated actions to save this species including initiating taxonomic research to prove they really were relict leopard frogs, studies of habitat needs, species distribution, population sizes, temperature tolerance, disease exposure, and husbandry techniques. The park also initiated a headstarting program and a multi-agency planning effort to develop a Conservation Agreement and Strategy (CAS) to save this species.
A petition to list the species as endangered was filed on May 8, 2002, but this petition was denied due to the existing CAS and the active program to restore the species outlined in that agreement. To date over 4400 juvenile frogs and approximately 8800 tadpoles have been reared from eggs in our headstarting program and these have been transplanted to fourteen additional springs with varying degrees of success. A status report on this program and the status of the species will be presented.


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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-21 15:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-15 10:53:27

Title: Use of a passive interrogation array to evaluate entrainment of endangered fish in an irrigation canal

Authors:
Speas, David W. 1
McAbee, Kevin 2
MacKinnon, Peter D. 3
Bestgen, Kevin R. 4
Walford, Cameron W. 4
Stahli, Julie 5

Affiliations:
1. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region
2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program
3. Utah State University, Department of Watershed Sciences
4. Colorado State University, Larval Fish Laboratory
5. Flathead Consulting, Denver CO

Abstract:
We investigated entrainment of endangered and non-listed native fish in the Green River Canal (Green River, UT) using passive integrated transponder technology during the 2013 and 2014 irrigation seasons. The Green River Canal is a 1.8 m3/s gravity-fed irrigation canal which operates annually during the months of April through November. Working with canal company officials, we constructed a solar-powered passive interrogation array (PIA) about 150 m below the canal intake gates in 2013 and a second system about 400 m below the gates in 2014. In 2013, 81% of all fish detected in the canal were Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus (499 individuals). Colorado pikeminnow, Ptychocheilus lucius and Flannelmouth Sucker, Catostomus latipinnis comprised 13% (77 individuals) and 5% (33 individuals) of all entrained fish, respectively. Three Bonytail, Gila elegans and a single Humpback Chub, Gila cyphawere also entrained. Peak rates of entrainment (up to 270 fish in a single day) were observed immediately following cessation of spring peak flows in July, at which point the canal diverted about half of the Green River discharge at times. Results from the 2014 irrigation season are forthcoming and will be presented. Entrainment rates of endangered fish in the Green River canal are significant and efforts are underway to reduce or eliminate entrainment most likely through exclusion structures. We will continue to monitor entrainment rates using PIAs following construction of exclusion structures.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-22 10:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-15 10:34:58

Title: Razorback Suckers in Upper Lake Powell, Utah: Preliminary results from an 11-week field study in 2014

Authors:
Francis, Travis 1
Hines, Brian 2
McKinstry, Mark 3
Speas, David 3

Affiliations:
1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Colorado Fishery Project
2. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Moab Field Station
3. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region

Abstract:
Recent studies on population characteristics of Razorback Sucker, Xyrauchen texanus in the San Juan Arm of Lake Powell (Utah) and in Lake Mead (Arizona/Nevada) prompted investigators to conduct a similar study in the mainstem Colorado River inflow area of Lake Powell, an area that falls largely outside critical habitat designations under the Endangered Species Act. Using a variety of techniques (electrofishing, netting, sonic telemetry), biologists sampled the Colorado River inflow area (lake miles [LM] 118 to 140) for 11 mostly consecutive weeks from April 14 through June 7, 2014. Over that time period, a total of 246 individual razorback suckers were captured (including 26 recaptures), of which 8.1% were of unknown origin (i.e., did not contain a PIT tag). The percentage of untagged fish from the Colorado River inflow area contrast sharply with that recorded in the San Juan Arm (~40%). Most individuals collected in the Colorado River arm originated from stocking events in Green River, UT. Ripe male and female fish were found in what appeared to be at least two distinct spawning aggregations near LM 134, and ripe individuals were also located further down lake later in the sampling season. In addition to razorback sucker, two Colorado Pikeminnow, Ptychocheilus lucius, four Bonytail, Gila elegans, and two Flannelmouth Sucker, Catostomus latipinnis were collected. Objectives for 2015 include expansion of adult reconnaissance sampling to include other inflow areas (Escalante and Dirty Devil rivers), refinement of netting techniques and increasing level of larval fish sampling effort.

Resumen:
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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 14:45:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-09 13:33:03

Title: Dispersal ability explains genetic and community patterns in Sonoran Desert streams

Authors:
Lytle A, David 1
Canedo-Arguelles, Miguel 1
Schriever A, Tiffany 1
Hartfield Kirk, Emily 1
Bogan T, Michael 2
Boersma S, Kate 3
Mims E, Meryl 4
Olden D, Julian 4

Affiliations:
1. Oregon State University
2. UC – Berkeley
3. San Diego University
4. University of Washington

Abstract:
Population genetic and community processes are governed by fundamentally different mechanisms, yet both take place in a single landscape with characteristic site-specific, local, and regional attributes. We characterized aquatic invertebrate communities from 28 sites spanning 7 aridland streams in SE Arizona, U.S.A. over 3 years. We also genotyped populations of aquatic insects that differed greatly in dispersal ability: a weak-disperser giant water bug (20 populations), a moderate-disperser stonefly (34 populations), and a strong-disperser beetle (31 populations). Using landscape genetics methods, we found that only stonefly populations showed a significant isolation-by-distance pattern across the landscape. Water bug populations were randomly differentiated due to genetic drift, and beetle population structure was eliminated by panmixia. After characterizing species by dispersal traits, community data revealed an analogous pattern. Only moderate-disperser community structure was explainable by landscape variables; weak-disperser community structure was dominated by site-specific environmental filters, and strong dispersers showed no pattern. Our results suggest that although evolutionary and ecological processes are distinct, the interaction between dispersal ability and landscape is a common cause underlying both.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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Presentation Date and Time: 2014-11-20 11:00:00

Submitted Date and Time: 2014-09-04 11:57:47

Title: Last-stand population ecology in fragmented rivers and conservation in de-facto refugia

Authors:
Hoagstrom, Chris 1
Archdeacon, Thomas 2
Davenport, Stephen 2
Propst, David 3
Brooks, James 3

Affiliations:
1. Department of Zoology, Weber State University
2. New Mexico Fish & Wildlife Conservation Office, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
3. Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico

Abstract:
Habitat destruction and subdivision associated with dams increasingly restrict sensitive riverine taxa to isolated reaches with residual habitat (i.e., de-facto refugia). Population dynamics in these reaches must be well understood to determine critical habitat features. We used 20 years of population-monitoring data to assess population trends and habitat associations for three imperiled, pelagic-broadcast spawning minnows (Notropis girardi, Notropis jemezanus, and Notropis simus pecosensis). The study reach had a regulated flow regime and three distinct sub-reaches with, from upstream to downstream, “discontinuous” (i.e., degraded) habitat, unchannelized (i.e., high quality) habitat, and channelized (i.e., degraded) habitat. We assessed population and flow-regime influences on recruitment and summarized distributional patterns of cohorts. Each population was persistent and dominated by a single year class. In two species, high-flow events regulated recruitment, which is typical for riverine, pelagic-broadcast spawning minnows. Populations of all three species centered in unchannelized habitat. Intra-reach habitat connectivity was important to facilitate movement to unchannelized habitat from climatic refugia and, in the case of N. s. pecosensis, to allow upstream return of juveniles displaced into channelized habitat as propagules or small age-0 individuals. Over-winter recruitment and climatic refugia appeared to help species withstand streamflow intermittence. Recognition that fragmentation has destroyed all but isolated refugia should motivate proactive place-based conservation where species make a “last stand”. Monitoring provides the basis for comprehensive assessment, but only threat alleviation ensures conservation.

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Presentation Type: Oral
Session: Contributed
Student Award: No

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